Yarmouth DUI-DWI Lawyer, Maine


Randall J. Bates

Litigation, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Clifford B. Strike

Traffic, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Michael Nicholas McAllister

Welfare, DUI-DWI, Identity Theft, Toxic Mold & Tort
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew B. Nichols

Litigation, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

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Luke Rioux

State Appellate Practice, Domestic Violence & Neglect, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas L. Richard

Child Support, DUI-DWI, Identity Theft, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Whipple

Divorce, Child Custody, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kristine C. Hanly

Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Randa A. Capponi

Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Robert C. LeBrasseur

Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

PLEA BARGAIN

A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crim... (more...)
A negotiation between the defense and prosecution (and sometimes the judge) that settles a criminal case. The defendant typically pleads guilty to a lesser crime (or fewer charges) than originally charged, in exchange for a guaranteed sentence that is shorter than what the defendant could face if convicted at trial. The prosecution gets the certainty of a conviction and a known sentence; the defendant avoids the risk of a higher sentence; and the judge gets to move on to other cases.

INFRACTION

A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, ho... (more...)
A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, however--refusing to identify oneself when involved in an accident is a misdemeanor in some states.

HOT PURSUIT

An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and a... (more...)
An exception to the general rule that a police officer needs an arrest warrant before he can enter a home to make an arrest. If a felony has just occurred and an officer has chased a suspect to a private house, the officer can forcefully enter the house in order to prevent the suspect from escaping or hiding or destroying evidence.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

IRRESISTIBLE IMPULSE TEST

A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his ac... (more...)
A seldom-used test for criminal insanity that labels the person insane if he could not control his actions when committing the crime, even though he knew his actions were wrong.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

BOOKING

A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed beh... (more...)
A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed behind bars. Nowadays, the book is likely to be a computer. Usually, a mug shot and fingerprints are taken, and the arrestee's clothing and personal effects are inventoried and stored.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

EAVESDROPPING

Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or bi... (more...)
Listening to conversations or observing conduct which is meant to be private, typically by using devices that amplify sound or light, such as stethoscopes or binoculars. The term comes from the common law offense of listening to private conversations by crouching under the windows or eaves of a house. Nowadays, eavesdropping includes using electronic equipment to intercept telephone or other wire communications, or radio equipment to intercept broadcast communications. Generally, the term 'eavesdropping' is used when the activity is not legally authorized by a search warrant or court order; and the term 'surveillance' is used when the activity is permitted by law. Compare electronic surveillance.