Wisconsin Rapids Child Support Lawyer, Wisconsin


Peter C. Lloyd Lawyer

Peter C. Lloyd

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic, Child Custody, Child Support

Attorney Peter Lloyd is an experienced lawyer practicing law in the Central Wisconsin area. He limits his practice to specific areas (family, criminal... (more)

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CONTACT

800-672-6840

David L. Grace

Construction, Family Law, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Leon S Schmidt

Social Security -- Disability, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Guy Robert Detlefsen Jr.

Family Law, Employment, Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years
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Theresa Ann Selenske

Traffic, Employee Rights, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Sally A. McDonald

Juvenile Law, Real Estate, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

AccuWeb, Inc. v. Engstrom

... Consequently, they argue that the circuit court and the court of appeals did not err in rejecting the conclusions in the Mesirow Report because, under Wisconsin law, the potential for an injury is not sufficient to support a claim by a plaintiff for damages. ...

MATTER OF DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS AGAINST BERLIN

... to the May 2002 automobile accident. ¶ 9 On April 29, 2005, the Milwaukee County Child Support Agency filed four claims against DB's estate for unpaid child support obligations totaling $126,200.28. ¶ 10 On or about May 24 ...

Christensen v. Sullivan

... In Griffin v. Reeve, 141 Wis.2d 699, 416 NW2d 612 (1987), the court held that contempt was an appropriate remedy for a court to utilize to enforce past due child support payments after the child has reached majority. Id. at 704, 416 NW2d 612. ...