Windham Wills & Probate Lawyer, Maine, page 3


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Tom S. Hanson

Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Eliza Cope Nolan

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Ronald A. Epstein

Tax, International Tax, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Carrie McGilvery Logan

Business & Trade, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years
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Barbara A. Vestal

Condominiums, Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Andrew J. Cloutier

Personal Injury, Social Security, Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Paul S. Bulger

Commercial Real Estate, Estate Administration, Wills & Probate, Business, Agriculture
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Thomas F. Jewell

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Jennifer L. Kruszewski

Government, Estate Administration, Estate, Reorganization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Robert W. Kline

Title Insurance, Wills & Probate, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

FINAL BENEFICIARY

The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jan... (more...)
The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jane receives income for the duration of her life. Their daughter, the final beneficiary, receives the trust principal after Jane's death.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Kingsbury

... Dissent: SAUFLEY, CJ, and ALEXANDER, and SILVER, JJ. CLIFFORD, J. [¶ 1] The estate of Bruce H. Kingsbury, through its personal representative, Robin L. Whorff, appeals from an order entered in the Sagadahoc County Probate Court (Voorhees, J.) (1) providing that Whorff ...

IN RE ESTATE OF LIPIN

... PER CURIAM. [¶ 1] Joan Carol Lipin challenges the denial of her request for recusal entered in the Cumberland County Probate Court (Mazziotti, J.) in connection with the probate of the estate of her father, Theodore Lipin. We ...

Edwards v. Campbell

... Campbell has appealed. II. DISCUSSION. [¶ 6] Campbell first contends that the court lacked subject matter jurisdiction to issue the contempt order as to the trust accounting, arguing instead that the Probate Court has exclusive jurisdiction over such matters. ...