Wilmington Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Delaware


Christofer C. Johnson Lawyer

Christofer C. Johnson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Criminal, Estate, Business

Chris Johnson is a native of Philadelphia and graduated from the William Penn Charter School. He received an academic scholarship to the University of... (more)

Elwood T. Eveland Lawyer

Elwood T. Eveland

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Elwood T. Eveland Jr. is a practicing lawyer in the state of Delaware specializing in Accident & Injury Law. Mr. Evelend received his J.D. from Widene... (more)

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CONTACT

800-656-9831

Alfred J. Lindh Lawyer

Alfred J. Lindh

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support

Alfred Lindh is a practicing lawyer in the state of Delaware specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Mr. Lindh received his J.D. from Georgetown Univers... (more)

Melanie George Smith Lawyer

Melanie George Smith

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Mediation, Business, Social Security -- Disability, Estate
The Lawyer Mom. Fierce advocacy and legal expertise you can rely on.

A magna cum laude graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University Law School, Melanie began her legal career serving as a law cle... (more)

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CONTACT

302-509-1752

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Suzanne I. Seubert

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Laurence I. Levinson

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law, Health Care
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Sarah C. Brannan

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Beth H. Christman

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen P. Casarino

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  55 Years

Michael W. Arrington

Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.