Wilmington Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Delaware


Elwood T. Eveland Lawyer

Elwood T. Eveland

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal

Elwood T. Eveland Jr. is a practicing lawyer in the state of Delaware specializing in Accident & Injury Law. Mr. Evelend received his J.D. from Widene... (more)

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800-656-9831

Christofer C. Johnson Lawyer

Christofer C. Johnson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Criminal, Estate, Business

Chris Johnson is a native of Philadelphia and graduated from the William Penn Charter School. He received an academic scholarship to the University of... (more)

Alfred J. Lindh Lawyer

Alfred J. Lindh

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support

Alfred Lindh is a practicing lawyer in the state of Delaware specializing in Divorce & Family Law. Mr. Lindh received his J.D. from Georgetown Univers... (more)

Vincent J X. Hedrick

Estate Planning, Natural Resources, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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Stephen P. Casarino

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  54 Years

Mary C. Boudart

Farms, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Sarah C. Brannan

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas A. Foley

Traffic, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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Colin M. Shalk

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Suzanne I. Seubert

Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

LAWFUL ISSUE

Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means... (more...)
Formerly, statutes governing wills used this phrase to specify children born to married parents, and to exclude those born out of wedlock. Now, the phrase means the same as issue and 'lineal descendant.'

ATTRACTIVE NUISANCE

Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and aba... (more...)
Something on a piece of property that attracts children but also endangers their safety. For example, unfenced swimming pools, open pits, farm equipment and abandoned refrigerators have all qualified as attractive nuisances.

PREMARITAL AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometim... (more...)
An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometimes whether alimony will be paid if the couple later divorces. Courts usually honor premarital agreements unless one person shows that the agreement was likely to promote divorce, was written with the intention of divorcing or was entered into unfairly. A premarital agreement may also be known as a 'prenuptial agreement.'

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'