Whitefish Bankruptcy Lawyer, Montana, page 2


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Peter Francis Carroll

Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kevin A Duff

Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Scott D. Hagel

Other, Landlord-Tenant, Consumer Rights, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Millicent A Leatzow

Government Agencies, Estate, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years
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Kent P. Saxby

Business, Estate, Real Estate, Credit & Debt, Income Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stewart E. Stadler

Dispute Resolution, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mies W Faerber

Government, Employment, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Amy Lee Kenison

Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

David Alan Mattingley

Landlord-Tenant, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

David E C Gettis

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  21 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

NONDISCHARGEABLE DEBTS

Debts that cannot be erased by filing for bankruptcy. If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, these debts will remain when your case is over. If you file for Chap... (more...)
Debts that cannot be erased by filing for bankruptcy. If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, these debts will remain when your case is over. If you file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the nondischargeable debts will have to be paid in full during your plan or you will have a balance at the end of your case. Examples of nondischargeable debts include alimony and child support, most income tax debts, many student loans and debts for personal injury or death caused by drunk driving. Compare dischargeable debts.

MEANS TEST

A formula that uses predefined income and expense categories to determine whether a debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income ... (more...)
A formula that uses predefined income and expense categories to determine whether a debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income for his or her state should be allowed to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

CREDIT FILE

See credit report.

CREDIT BUREAU

A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit... (more...)
A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit card companies that use the information to screen applicants for loans and credit cards. There are three major credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and Trans Union, and they are regulated by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

CHAPTER 13 BANKRUPTCY

The reorganization bankruptcy for consumers, in which you partially or fully repay your debts. In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you keep your property and use your inc... (more...)
The reorganization bankruptcy for consumers, in which you partially or fully repay your debts. In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you keep your property and use your income to pay all or a portion of the debts over three to five years. The minimum amount you must pay is roughly equal to the value of your nonexempt property. In addition, you must pledge your disposable net income -- after subtracting reasonable expenses -- for the period during which you are making payments. At the end of the three-to five-year period, the balance of what you owe on most debts is erased.

CCCS

See Consumer Credit Counseling Service.

GARNISHMENT

A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if ... (more...)
A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if she loses a lawsuit filed by the creditor. Up to 25% of a person's wages can be deducted.

COLLECTION AGENCY

A company hired by a creditor to collect a debt that it is owed. Creditors typically hire a collection agency only after they have made efforts to collect the d... (more...)
A company hired by a creditor to collect a debt that it is owed. Creditors typically hire a collection agency only after they have made efforts to collect the debt themselves, typically through letters (called 'dunning' letters) and telephone calls. Collection agencies are regulated by the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Unfortunately, too many collectors ignore this law.

LIABILITY

(1) The state of being liable--that is, legally responsible for an act or omission. Example:Peri hires Paul to fix a broken pipe in her bathroom, but the new pi... (more...)
(1) The state of being liable--that is, legally responsible for an act or omission. Example:Peri hires Paul to fix a broken pipe in her bathroom, but the new pipe bursts the day after Paul installs it, ruining the bathroom floor. This raises the issue of liability: Who is responsible for the damage? Peri claims that Paul is responsible, and sues him for the cost of hiring another plumber to fix the pipe and replacing the floor. Paul, in turn, claims that the pipe manufacturer is responsible, because they supplied him with faulty materials. Both Peri and Paul must prove their claims in court; if Paul and/or the manufacturer is found liable, one or both will have to pay damages to Peri. (2) Something for which a person is liable. For example, a debt is often called a liability.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. McWilliams

... 6 4. Whether the District Court erred in sentencing McWilliams to pay restitution of sums that had been discharged by his bankruptcy proceeding. Factual and Procedural Background. ... 12 McWilliams and his wife had filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy in May 1997. ...

Stipe v. First Interstate Bank

... The Stipes then sought bankruptcy protection. Because the Stipes lacked sufficient resources to care for the cattle, the Bankruptcy court granted FIB relief from the automatic bankruptcy stay, which allowed FIB to pursue non-bankruptcy remedies to repossess the cattle. ...

Dovey v. BNSF RAILWAY COMPANY

... BACKGROUND. ¶4 Dovey had financial difficulties which ultimately led him to file for bankruptcy. He first met with his bankruptcy attorney Steven Winship ("Winship") on June 1, 2004. ... 7 On October 21, 2004, Dovey filed a Chapter 7 petition for bankruptcy. ...