West Rutland Landlord-Tenant Lawyer, Vermont


William A. O'Rourke

Real Estate, Traffic, Estate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph P. Jiloty

Real Estate, Traffic, Lawsuit, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mark E. Furlan

Real Estate, DUI-DWI, Criminal, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

John A. Facey

Real Estate, Condominiums, Business Organization, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years
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Stephen L. Klein

Real Estate, Traffic, Lawsuit, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher Allan Davis

Landlord-Tenant, Child Custody, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shawn K. Jarecki

Personal Injury, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Landlord-Tenant
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas J. Layden

Landlord-Tenant
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott S. Smith

Real Estate, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul A. Donaldson

Commercial Real Estate, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

FUTURE INTEREST

A right to property that cannot be enforced in the present, but only at some time in the future. For example, John's will leaves his house to his sister Marian,... (more...)
A right to property that cannot be enforced in the present, but only at some time in the future. For example, John's will leaves his house to his sister Marian, but only after the death of his wife, Hillary. Marian has a future interest in the house.

SEIZURE

The taking of physical evidence or property by law enforcement officials. This runs the gamut from taking blood for a drug test to impounding a car used in a ro... (more...)
The taking of physical evidence or property by law enforcement officials. This runs the gamut from taking blood for a drug test to impounding a car used in a robbery. The police must generally obtain a search warrant, or court order, before they can seize personal property.

REFUGEE

In the context of U.S. immigration law, people who have been allowed to live in the United States indefinitely to protect them from persecution in their home co... (more...)
In the context of U.S. immigration law, people who have been allowed to live in the United States indefinitely to protect them from persecution in their home countries. Refugees get their status before coming to the U.S., while asylum seekers obtain their status after arrival. Refugees may eventually get green cards.

EVICTION

Removal of a tenant from rental property by a law enforcement officer. First, the landlord must file and win an eviction lawsuit, also known as an 'unlawful det... (more...)
Removal of a tenant from rental property by a law enforcement officer. First, the landlord must file and win an eviction lawsuit, also known as an 'unlawful detainer.'

LEASE

An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an ... (more...)
An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an apartment or business property) or personal property (such as a car or a boat). A lease should cover basic issues such as when the lease will begin and end, the rent or other costs, how payments should be made, and any restrictions on the use of the property. The property owner is often called the 'lessor,' and the person using the property is called the 'lessee.'

ADVERSE POSSESSION

A means by which one can legally take another's property without paying for it. The requirements for adversely possessing property vary between states, but usua... (more...)
A means by which one can legally take another's property without paying for it. The requirements for adversely possessing property vary between states, but usually include continuous and open use for a period of five or more years and paying taxes on the property in question.

EVIDENCE

The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony... (more...)
The many types of information presented to a judge or jury designed to convince them of the truth or falsity of key facts. Evidence typically includes testimony of witnesses, documents, photographs, items of damaged property, government records, videos and laboratory reports. Rules that are as strict as they are quirky and technical govern what types of evidence can be properly admitted as part of a trial. For example, the hearsay rule purports to prevent secondhand testimony of the 'he said, she said' variety, but the existence of dozens of exceptions often means that hairsplitting lawyers can find a way to introduce such testimony into evidence. See also admissible evidence, inadmissible evidence.

USUFRUCT

The right to use property -- or income from property -- that is owned by another.

LICENSE (OF INVENTION, COPYRIGHT OR TRADEMARK)

A contract giving written permission to use an invention, creative work or trademark. A license provides a way to make money from your invention or creative wor... (more...)
A contract giving written permission to use an invention, creative work or trademark. A license provides a way to make money from your invention or creative work without having to manufacture and sell copies yourself. By licensing an invention or work to a company, you get money (often in the form of royalties) in return for allowing the company to use, produce and sell copies of your invention or work in the marketplace.