West Baldwin Estate Planning Lawyer, Maine


Includes: Gift Taxation

J. Daniel Hoffman

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

David R. Hastings

Commercial Real Estate, Land Use & Zoning, Estate Planning, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  72 Years

Peter Malia

Estate Planning, Civil Rights, Collection, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Peter G. Hastings

Municipal, Estate Planning, Non-profit, Commercial Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  61 Years
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Adam J Bean

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Business, Consumer Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Barry L. Kohler

Prosecution, Estate Planning, Insurance, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thaddeus V. Day

International Tax, Estate Planning, Family Law, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bruce R. Johnson

Trusts, Estate Planning, Business Successions, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  53 Years

Hesper Schleiderer-Hardy

Family Law, Estate Planning, Prosecution, Collaborative Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Kate L. Geoffroy

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

INVESTOR

A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes invest... (more...)
A person who makes investments. An investor may act either for herself or on behalf of others. A stock broker or mutual fund manager, for instance, makes investments for others who have entrusted her with their money.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.