Waynesboro Estate Lawyer, Mississippi


Cecelia  Arnold Lawyer

Cecelia Arnold

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal, Accident & Injury, Property Damage

Cecelia Arnold is a practicing lawyer in the state of Mississippi.

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CONTACT

800-692-2150

Stewart Jones Gilchrist

Estate Planning, Estate, Corporate, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew Steven Cardwell

Personal Injury, Estate, Oil & Gas, Accident & Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

C Everette Boutwell

Commercial Real Estate, Litigation, Industry Specialties, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  47 Years
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Wayman Dal Williamson

Personal Injury, Life & Health, Wills, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Frances M Young

Trusts
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  51 Years

Dawn E Fulce

Real Estate, Estate, Employment, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Damon Glenn Carpenter

Estate, Banking & Finance, Business, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

J Kearney Travis

Private Schools, Commercial Real Estate, Estate Planning, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  58 Years

Robert T. Jackson

Tax, Wills & Probate, Contract, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  55 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Waynesboro Estate Lawyers and Waynesboro Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

WILL

A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for you... (more...)
A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for your young children.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.