Washita Estate Lawyer, Oklahoma


Dustin Lane Compton Lawyer

Dustin Lane Compton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Business, Litigation

What makes Dustin and his firm different is the deep emotional connection he builds with each client and the time he takes to get to know their trials... (more)

Fletcher D Handley Lawyer

Fletcher D Handley

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Oil & Gas

Fletcher Dal Handley, Jr., is a civil justice attorney with The Handley Law Center in Oklahoma. His practice is focused on Personal Injury Law, repres... (more)

Dustin Lane Compton Lawyer

Dustin Lane Compton

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Business, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute

What makes Dustin and his firm different is the deep emotional connection he builds with each client and the time he takes to get to know their trials... (more)

Deborah A Sterkel

Banking & Finance, Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Stephen R. McCalla

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tom A. Frailey

Corporate, Estate Planning, Municipal, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Harold David Hanes

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Litigation, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Kyle Neil Eastwood

Accident & Injury, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Richard A. Williams

Real Estate, Federal Trial Practice, Civil & Human Rights, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

John W. Garland

Real Estate, Federal Trial Practice, Civil & Human Rights, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Washita Estate Lawyers and Washita Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

POUR-OVER WILL

A will that 'pours over' property into a trust when the will maker dies. Property left through the will must go through probate before it goes into the trust.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

POWER OF APPOINTMENT

The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust o... (more...)
The legal authority to decide who will receive someone else's property, usually property held in a trust. Most trustees can distribute the income from a trust only according to the terms of the trust, but a trustee with a power of appointment can choose the beneficiaries, sometimes from a list of candidates specified by the grantor. For example, Karin creates a trust with power of appointment to benefit either the local art museum, symphony, library or park, depending on the trustee's assessment of need.

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.