Warsaw Bankruptcy Lawyer, Indiana


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Anita Kay Gloyeski

Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

John David Barrett

Traffic, Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Christopher Graden Walter

Traffic, Divorce, Misdemeanor, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Warsaw Bankruptcy Lawyers and Warsaw Bankruptcy Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Bankruptcy & Debt areas including Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

FDCPA

See Fair Debt Collections & Practices Act.

MEETING OF CREDITORS

A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a f... (more...)
A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a few questions. In a Chapter 7, the meeting of creditors lasts a few minutes and rarely do any creditors show up. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, one or two creditors may attend, especially if they disagree with some provision of your repayment plan.

CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY

The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 b... (more...)
The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 bankruptcy takes from three to six months, costs about $200, and commonly requires only one trip to the courthouse.

TRADE NAME

The official name of a business, the one it uses on its letterhead and bank account when not dealing with consumers.

MEANS TEST

A formula that uses predefined income and expense categories to determine whether a debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income ... (more...)
A formula that uses predefined income and expense categories to determine whether a debtor whose current monthly income is higher than the median family income for his or her state should be allowed to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT (FLSA)

A federal law that guarantees a worker's right to be paid fairly. The FLSA defines the 40-hour workweek, sets out the federal minimum wage, states requirements ... (more...)
A federal law that guarantees a worker's right to be paid fairly. The FLSA defines the 40-hour workweek, sets out the federal minimum wage, states requirements for overtime and places restrictions on child labor.

WORKOUT

A debtor's plan to take care of a debt, by paying it off or through loan forgiveness. Workouts are often created to avoid bankruptcy or foreclosure proceedings.

GARNISHMENT

A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if ... (more...)
A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if she loses a lawsuit filed by the creditor. Up to 25% of a person's wages can be deducted.

DISPOSABLE INCOME

The difference between a debtor's current monthly income and allowable expenses. This is the amount that the new bankruptcy law deems available to pay into a Ch... (more...)
The difference between a debtor's current monthly income and allowable expenses. This is the amount that the new bankruptcy law deems available to pay into a Chapter 13 plan.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Green Tree Servicing, LLC v. Brough

... at p. 9. Subsequently, Brough defaulted on the Contract. In 2003, Brough filed a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana. ... Brough's debt to Green Tree was addressed in the bankruptcy proceedings. ...

McClure v. Cooper

... III. Whether Cooper lacked standing to file this claim. Facts and Procedural History. Cooper hired McClure to perform certain legal services and paid him a retainer, including funds for a bankruptcy court filing fee. ... Small Claims Rule 12(A). Cooper hired McClure to file bankruptcy. ...

Morgan County Hosp. v. Upham

... In her interrogatory answers, provided to Appellants on November 4, 1998, Upham stated that she had never filed for bankruptcy. ... Under schedule B of the bankruptcy petition, Upham was asked to disclose all "[c]ontingent and [n]on-contingent interests in estate of decedent. . . ...