Vancouver Child Custody Lawyer, Washington


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Roger Dennis Priest

Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Criminal, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Jill Huebschman Sasser

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Lori Ann Ferguson

Estate Planning, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Jennifer Ann Nugent

Landlord-Tenant, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Karen L Webber

Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce & Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Margaret Madison Phelan

Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Juliet Laycoe

Estate Planning, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Juliet Carolyn Laycoe

Estate Planning, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Tana May Bieniewicz

Government, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

Ivan Culbertson

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.