Tupelo Divorce Lawyer, Mississippi


Includes: Alimony & Spousal Support

Brent  McBride Lawyer

Brent McBride

VERIFIED
Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law

W Brent McBride is a practicing lawyer in the state of Mississippi.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-971-6540

John Patrick Robbins Lawyer

John Patrick Robbins

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Felony, Bankruptcy, Car Accident

John Robbins, is an experienced lawyer who is dedicated to helping everyday people resolve their legal problems and achieve their goals. Every client ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-798-1641

Henderson M. Jones

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Bad Faith Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Robert W. Davis

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Jason D. Herring

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Bad Faith Insurance, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Camila Alexandra Mcelwain

Divorce, Personal Injury, Immigration, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Reagan David Wise

Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Corporate, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory Maril Hunsucker

Construction, Litigation, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Alexander J Simpson

Other, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

M. Gabriela Ungo

Visa, Labor Law, Family Law, Freedom of Religion
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CONSUMMATION

The actualization of a marriage. Sexual intercourse is required to 'consummate' a marriage. Failure to do so is grounds for divorce or annulment.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER (TRO)

An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court ... (more...)
An order that tells one person to stop harassing or harming another, issued after the aggrieved party appears before a judge. Once the TRO is issued, the court holds a second hearing where the other side can tell his story and the court can decide whether to make the TRO permanent by issuing an injunction. Although a TRO will often not stop an enraged spouse from acting violently, the police are more willing to intervene if the abused spouse has a TRO.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Luse v. Luse

... DISCUSSION. 1. Whether the chancery court erred in granting a divorce on the grounds of desertion when the proceedings were not heard in open court as required pursuant to Mississippi Code Annotated section 93-5-17(1) (Rev.2004). ...

Bowen v. Bowen

... CARLSON, Justice, for the Court. ¶ 1. Joe and Betty Bowen were granted a divorce on the ground of irreconcilable differences. ... Upon their divorce, Joe paid Donna one-half of the appraised value of the marina, which was $200,000, to acquire Donna's interest. ...

Shavers v. Shavers

... En Banc. SMITH, Chief Justice, for the Court. ¶1. This appeal involves three consolidated appeals filed by John E. Shavers (John) arising from the divorce action filed by his wife, Ann Shavers (Ann). ... John also has filed a notice of appeal as to the final judgment of divorce. ...