Tunica Trusts Lawyer, Mississippi


Constance Kiara Brown

Litigation, Trusts, Public Law, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Katherine Virginia Kemp

Dispute Resolution, Trusts, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

John Thomas Wilkinson

Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Wrongful Termination, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

John T. Wilkinson

Federal Appellate Practice, Government, Trusts, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years
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Christina Diane West

Trusts, Trade Associations, Civil & Human Rights, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Martin Zummach

Trusts, Family Law, Civil Rights, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Kim Jones

Trusts, Commercial Real Estate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Kimberly Scruggs Jones

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Abi Salu

Family Law, Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

Kimberly Scruggs Jones

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Trusts, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

OFFICER

A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operation... (more...)
A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. Officers generally hold titles such as President or Treasurer. Many states and most corporate bylaws or LLC operating agreements require a corporation or LLC to have a president, secretary and treasurer. Election of a vice president may be required by state law.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Joel v. Joel

... 10. Jimmy's will devised his property to two trusts, with his attorney, Meador, as trustee of both. Debbie was executrix of Jimmy's estate. ... 684, 690-91, 78 So.2d 758, 760 (1955) (quoting 54 Am.Jur. Trusts § 225). [16] Allred v. Fairchild, 785 So.2d 1064, 1068 (Miss.2001). ...

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF BAUMGARDNER v. Ready

... ROBERT D. JONES, HENRY P. PATE, III, Attorneys for Appellee. BEFORE CARLSON, PJ, RANDOLPH AND KITCHENS, JJ. CARLSON, PRESIDING JUSTICE, FOR THE COURT: ¶ 1. This case involves fifteen years of litigation relating to two testamentary trusts. ...

Wright v. O'DANIEL

... The statute of limitations applicable to actions involving constructive trusts provides in pertinent part: ... Janet filed her complaint seeking the imposition of a constructive trust on October 23, 2007, well within the ten-year limitations period applicable to constructive trusts. ...