Timber Child Custody Lawyer, Oregon

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Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Larry K. Gray Lawyer

Larry K. Gray

VERIFIED
Divorce, Elder Law, Trusts, Child Custody, Wills & Probate

At Larry K. Gray & Associates P.C., the emphasis and focus are to provide sound advice, top quality document preparation, and/or reasoned advocacy for... (more)

Bob  Casey Lawyer

Bob Casey

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Business Organization

Bob Casey is a practicing attorney in the state of Oregon. He graduated from Seattle University School of Law in 1991 with his J.D.

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CONTACT

800-951-9470

Chris Burnett

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Wills & Probate, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Michael A. Schmidt

Power of Attorney, Medicare & Medicaid, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years
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Erin Levine

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Jeffrey M Greenspan

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Child Custody, Legal Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Brenda Winikka

Divorce & Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

P Daniel Strausbaugh

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Alex West

Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

Christopher Hamilton

Education, Employment Discrimination, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Disability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

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CONTACT

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT (COBRA)

A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they ... (more...)
A federal law requiring that employers offer employees -- and their spouses and dependents -- continuing insurance coverage if their work hours are cut or they lose their job for any reason other than gross misconduct. Courts are still in the process of determining the meaning of gross misconduct, but it's clearly more serious than poor performance or judgment. COBRA also makes an ex-spouse and children eligible to receive group rate health insurance provided by the other ex-spouse's employer for three years following a divorce.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).