Texarkana Credit & Debt Lawyer, Arkansas


Jasmine Felicia Crockett

Entertainment, Credit & Debt, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald Mattson Keil

Landlord-Tenant, Immigration, Wrongful Termination, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Joshua Landes Potter

Wills, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Joe Carter Short

Pension & Benefits, Divorce, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years
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Roger D. Bush

Elder Law, Litigation, Personal Injury, Consumer Bankruptcy
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  48 Years

David Cecil Graham

Bankruptcy, Personal Injury, Social Security, Family Law, Disability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Barry D. Barber

Real Estate, Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Texarkana Credit & Debt Lawyers and Texarkana Credit & Debt Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Bankruptcy & Debt areas including Bankruptcy, Collection, Reorganization and Workout attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

DISPOSABLE INCOME

The difference between a debtor's current monthly income and allowable expenses. This is the amount that the new bankruptcy law deems available to pay into a Ch... (more...)
The difference between a debtor's current monthly income and allowable expenses. This is the amount that the new bankruptcy law deems available to pay into a Chapter 13 plan.

LIEN

The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortg... (more...)
The right of a secured creditor to grab a specific item of property if you don't pay a debt. Liens you agree to are called security interests, and include mortgages, home equity loans, car loans and personal loans for which you pledge property to guarantee repayment. Liens created without your consent are called nonconsensual liens, and include judgment liens (liens filed by a creditor who has sued you and obtained a judgment), tax liens and mechanics liens (liens filed by a contractor who worked on your house but wasn't paid).

CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY

The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 b... (more...)
The most familiar type of bankruptcy, in which many or all of your debts are wiped out completely in exchange for giving up your nonexempt property. Chapter 7 bankruptcy takes from three to six months, costs about $200, and commonly requires only one trip to the courthouse.

MEETING OF CREDITORS

A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a f... (more...)
A meeting held with the bankruptcy trustee about a month after you file for bankruptcy. You must attend. The trustee reviews your bankruptcy papers and asks a few questions. In a Chapter 7, the meeting of creditors lasts a few minutes and rarely do any creditors show up. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, one or two creditors may attend, especially if they disagree with some provision of your repayment plan.

REDEMPTION

In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump s... (more...)
In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump sum. For example, a debtor may redeem a car note by paying the lender the amount a retail vendor would charge for the car, considering its age and condition.

NONEXEMPT PROPERTY

The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typicall... (more...)
The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typically includes valuable clothing (furs) and electronic equipment, an expensive car that's been paid off and most of the equity in your house. Compare exempt property.

AUTOMATIC STAY

An injunction automatically issued by the bankruptcy court when a debtor files for bankruptcy. The automatic stay prohibits most creditor collection activities,... (more...)
An injunction automatically issued by the bankruptcy court when a debtor files for bankruptcy. The automatic stay prohibits most creditor collection activities, such as filing or continuing lawsuits, making written requests for payment, or notifying credit reporting bureaus of an unpaid debt.

REAFFIRMATION

An agreement that a debtor and a creditor enter into after a debtor has filed for bankruptcy, in which the debtor agrees to repay all or part of an existing deb... (more...)
An agreement that a debtor and a creditor enter into after a debtor has filed for bankruptcy, in which the debtor agrees to repay all or part of an existing debt after the bankruptcy case is over. For instance, a debtor might make a reaffirmation agreement with the holder of a car note that the debtor can keep the car and must continue to pay the debt after bankruptcy.

TRADE NAME

The official name of a business, the one it uses on its letterhead and bank account when not dealing with consumers.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Broggi-Dunn v. Dunn

... Mr. Dunn testified that the mortgage debt for the marital home was approximately $104,000, and the line-of-credit debt associated with the home was approximately $9,800. Mr. Dunn believed, however, that the property was worth less than $100,000. ...

Hawkins v. Hawkins

... Appellant, Kendrick D. Hawkins, argues on direct appeal that the circuit court erred in awarding appellee a portion of his military retirement benefits and that the court erred in dividing the credit-card debt between the parties. ...

McClure v. Schollmier-McClure

... On cross-appeal, Tracy contends that the trial court erred in finding that the parties' home was marital property and in requiring her to pay a portion of John's credit card debt. ... Finally, John testified that he had credit card debt of $53,000. ...