Tesuque Family Law Lawyer, New Mexico


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Gary Douglas Elion

Family Law, Banking & Finance, International, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aaron J. Wolf

Constitutional Law, Family Law, Criminal, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael J. Golden

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan Schaefer Mcdevitt

Mediation, Immigration, Collaborative Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Amber R. Macias-Mayo

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amber Train

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

C. Brian James

Transportation & Shipping, Natural Resources, Family Law, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Andrea La Cruz-Crawford

Natural Resources, Civil Rights, Family Law, International Other
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gretchen Elsner

Civil Rights, Family Law, Federal, Military & Veterans Appeals
Status:  In Good Standing           

Maria T. Griego

Family Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Tesuque Family Law Lawyers and Tesuque Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

ADOPTED CHILD

Any person, whether an adult or a minor, who is legally adopted as the child of another in a court proceeding. See adoption.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Karpien v. Karpien

... No. 28,060. Court of Appeals of New Mexico. March 16, 2009. 1166 Sidney Childress, The Childress Law Office, Albuquerque, NM for Appellant. The Family Law Firm by Felissa M. Garcia, Donna Trujillo Dodd, Albuquerque, NM, for Appellee. 1167 OPINION. CASTILLO, Judge. ...

In re Griego

... Rule 21-200(A) states that "[a] judge shall respect and comply with the law and shall act at all times in a manner that promotes public confidence in the integrity and impartiality of the judiciary," and Rule 21-200(B) provides that "[a] judge shall not allow family, social, political or ...

IN RE CABLE FAMILY TRUST JUNE 10, 1987

... intended by the grantors in this case, we do not need to hypothesize whether an unrestricted power to withdraw necessarily includes a power to amend in all cases as a matter of law. I. BACKGROUND. {2} In July 1987, Lowell and Martha Cable created the Cable Family Trust to ...

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