Sugar City Adoption Lawyer, Idaho


William P Combo Lawyer

William P Combo

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Personal Injury, Criminal, Business

I have been successful in extricating several clients from very ugly Divorce proceedings involving complicated issues of property, child custody and s... (more)

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CONTACT

208-524-5380

John Orval Avery

Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Sadri Ann Butler

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  15 Years

Theodore Jason Wood

Personal Injury, Employment Discrimination, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years
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Dale P Thomson

Family Law, Criminal, Contract, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

David Alonso Johnson

Lawsuit & Dispute, Divorce & Family Law, Business, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

David Anthony Johnson

Wills & Probate, Family Law, Criminal, Car Accident, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Tyson Nyle Raymond

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

James Andrew Pendlebury

Landlord-Tenant, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

John Petui Osai

Tax, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

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Easily find Sugar City Adoption Lawyers and Sugar City Adoption Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Doe v. IDAHO DEPT. OF HEALTH & WELFARE

248 P.3d 742 (2011). In re the Adoption Of John Doe. ... The magistrate dismissed the adoption petition and granted summary judgment to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, which has legal custody of AH, because the Department refused to consent to the adoption. ...

Doe v. Doe

... They argue that Father abandoned GP and, in the alternative, Father's consent was not required for Step-Father's adoption of GP as Father's parental rights never ripened. The magistrate judge found that Father had abandoned GP and terminated his parental rights. ...

IN RE MATTER OF TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF ADOPTION OF DOE

Father and Mother were married on September 20, 1997, and divorced on January 12, 2004. They had two children during their marriage: a daughter who was about five and one-half years old at the time of the divorce and a son who was almost four years old. The divorce ...