South Weymouth Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Steven  Rosenberg Lawyer

Steven Rosenberg

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Employment, Business, Real Estate

A member of the Massachusetts Bar for more than 30 years, Attorney Steven Rosenberg concentrates his practice counseling and representing small and me... (more)

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781-749-5600

William Kevin Brown Lawyer

William Kevin Brown

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Landlord-Tenant, Business & Trade, Real Estate
We handle all types domestic relations personal injury, landlord/tenant and business litigation

The Law Office of William K. Brown is a general practice firm that serves the varied needs of our clients. Our attorneys are well versed in many areas... (more)

Arthur P. Murphy Lawyer

Arthur P. Murphy

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Employment, Business, Divorce & Family Law

Mr. Murphy’s legal career emphasizes management labor, corporate, and litigation matters. Selected in the publication of Best Lawyers in America, Mr... (more)

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CONTACT

800-940-6911

Susan Castleton Ryan

Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Wayne V. Gilbert

Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Estate, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

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Doug Surprenant

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Employee Rights, Employment Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

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Stanley Kroll

Mediation, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Custody & Visitation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Jessica Ann Foley

DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul C. Bishop

Estate, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

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Josey Lyne Payne

Personal Injury, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find South Weymouth Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and South Weymouth Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

LEGAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal... (more...)
The right and obligation to make decisions about a child's upbringing, including schooling and medical care. Many states typically have both parents share legal custody of a child. Compare physical custody.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

PALIMONY

A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other afte... (more...)
A non-legal term coined by journalists to describe the division of property or alimony-like support given by one member of an unmarried couple to the other after they break up.

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.