South Bend Misdemeanor Lawyer, Indiana


Jay  Lauer Lawyer

Jay Lauer

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal, Family Law, Child Support

Attorney Jay Lauer has been practicing law in the state of Indiana for 40 years, but his love and passion for the law actually goes back further than ... (more)

Clint Anthony Zalas Lawyer

Clint Anthony Zalas

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Criminal, Car Accident, Divorce

He is an experienced trial attorney whose primary concentration is on plaintiff medical malpractice, plaintiff personal injury, personal injury defens... (more)

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CONTACT

800-816-6470

James Henry Lockwood Lawyer

James Henry Lockwood

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate

As a person who has experienced a disability as well as the trials and tribulations that go along with it, I know how crucial fair treatment before th... (more)

Elizabeth Bellin

Other, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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David Arthur Wemhoff

Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate, Intellectual Property
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

George Edward Horn

Education, Litigation, Wills & Probate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

George E. Horn

Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Marvin Lopata

Landlord-Tenant, Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Sean Patrick Hilgendorf

Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Government, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Stephen G Drendall

Family Law, Criminal, Consumer Protection, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

MISTRIAL

A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on ... (more...)
A trial that ends prematurely and without a judgment, due either to a mistake that jeopardizes a party's right to a fair trial or to a jury that can't agree on a verdict (a hung jury) If a judge declares a mistrial in a civil case, he or she will direct that the case be set for a new trial at a future date. Mistrials in criminal cases can result in a retrial, a plea bargain or a dismissal of the charges.

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT

The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced '... (more...)
The burden of proof that the prosecution must carry in a criminal trial to obtain a guilty verdict. Reasonable doubt is sometimes explained as being convinced 'to a moral certainty.' The jury must be convinced that the defendant committed each element of the crime before returning a guilty verdict.

ARRAIGNMENT

A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters... (more...)
A court appearance in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime and asked to respond by pleading guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. Other matters often handled at the arraignment are arranging for the appointment of a lawyer to represent the defendant and the setting of bail.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.