South Bend Estate Lawyer, Indiana


Lucinda  Kil Gillis Lawyer

Lucinda Kil Gillis

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Estate, Workers' Compensation, Medical Malpractice, Social Security -- Disability
Attorney and Registered Nurse practicing in Injuries, Medical Malpractice, Work Injuries, Disability

Lucinda Kil Gillis is an attorney and RN, specializes in Worker's Compensation, Social Security Disability, Medical Malpractice, Personal Injury, Acci... (more)

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800-979-0180

James Henry Lockwood Lawyer

James Henry Lockwood

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate

As a person who has experienced a disability as well as the trials and tribulations that go along with it, I know how crucial fair treatment before th... (more)

Richard E. Bryant Lawyer

Richard E. Bryant

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute, Real Estate, Bankruptcy & Debt

Richard E Bryant, a native of Elkhart IN, has been licensed to practice law since 2010. He graduated the Thomas Cooley Law School and is a member of t... (more)

David Arthur Wemhoff

Criminal, Accident & Injury, Estate, Intellectual Property
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

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Michael C. Murphy

Health Care, Wills, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Thomas S. Botkin

Intellectual Property, Estate Planning, Corporate, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Ronald J. Jaicomo

Corporate, Trusts, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas Clement Sopko

Merger & Acquisition, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jennifer L. VanderVeen

Tax, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

John Henry Peddycord

Commercial Real Estate, Estate Planning, State and Local, Real Estate
Status:  Inactive           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find South Bend Estate Lawyers and South Bend Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

ESTATE PLANNING

The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your... (more...)
The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your estate may involve making a will, living trust, healthcare directives, durable power of attorney for finances or other documents.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.