Sisters Estate Planning Lawyer, Oregon

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Includes: Gift Taxation

Milly Whatley

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Kitri C. Ford

Insurance, Estate Planning, Estate, Wills
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  32 Years

Deidra Cherzan

International Tax, Estate Planning, Divorce, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Casey R Baxter

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years
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Robert Paul Kutz

Corporate, Civil Rights, Estate Planning, Dispute Resolution
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Sisters Estate Planning Lawyers and Sisters Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

BENEFICIARY

A person or organization legally entitled to receive benefits through a legal device, such as a will, trust or life insurance policy.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

INTESTATE

The condition of dying without a valid will. The probate court appoints an administrator to distribute the deceased person's property according to state law.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Connall v. Felton

... a friend. The deed stated that "[t]he true and actual consideration paid for this transfer is $-0-; estate planning." The decedent had the deed notarized at a title insurance company and then recorded the deed. Plaintiff learned ...

LANDAUER v. LANDAUER

... that defendants had acted in concert to exercise undue influence over Henry and Gertrude in a manner that induced them to sell the farm for less than its fair market value under terms that they did not comprehend and that were inconsistent with their estate planning objectives. ...

Landauer v. Landauer

... that defendants had acted in concert to exercise undue influence over Henry and Gertrude in a manner that induced them to sell the farm for less than its fair market value under terms that they did not comprehend and that were inconsistent with their estate planning objectives. ...

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