Scappoose Estate Lawyer, Oregon

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Bob  Casey Lawyer

Bob Casey

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Business Organization

Bob Casey is a practicing attorney in the state of Oregon. He graduated from Seattle University School of Law in 1991 with his J.D.

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CONTACT

800-951-9470

Richard Lee Grant Lawyer

Richard Lee Grant

VERIFIED
Estate, Business, Litigation, Real Estate, Collection

Attorney Richard L. Grant, P.C. has 35 years of experience serving clients in Oregon. We assist in general civil litigation matters, deal with the var... (more)

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CONTACT

800-670-9740

Bonnie M. Popia

Business Organization, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

John D. Peterson

Corporate, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Kathryn Smith Root

Litigation, International, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kathy Proctor

Wills, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Toby Borst

Business Organization, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aaron S Lohman

Estate Planning, Business & Trade, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Abby Wool Landon

Litigation, Estate Planning, Business, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

Adam Rittenberg

Real Estate, Litigation, Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Scappoose Estate Lawyers and Scappoose Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

ENDOWMENT INSURANCE

Provides that an insured person who lives for the specified endowment period receives the face value of the insurance policy--that is, the amount paid at death.... (more...)
Provides that an insured person who lives for the specified endowment period receives the face value of the insurance policy--that is, the amount paid at death. If the policy-holder dies sooner, the beneficiary named in the policy receives the proceeds.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

CERTIFICATION OF TRUST

See abstract of trust.

LIFE BENEFICIARY

A person who receives benefits, under a trust or by will, for his or her lifetime. For an example, see AB trust.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.