Scappoose Estate Lawyer, Oregon

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Richard Lee Grant Lawyer

Richard Lee Grant

VERIFIED
Estate, Business, Litigation, Real Estate, Collection

Attorney Richard L. Grant, P.C. has 35 years of experience serving clients in Oregon. We assist in general civil litigation matters, deal with the var... (more)

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800-670-9740

Bob  Casey Lawyer

Bob Casey

VERIFIED
Estate, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Business Organization

Bob Casey is a practicing attorney in the state of Oregon. He graduated from Seattle University School of Law in 1991 with his J.D.

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CONTACT

800-951-9470

Bonnie M. Popia

Business Organization, Wills & Probate, Elder Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kathy Proctor

Wills, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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John D. Peterson

Corporate, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kathryn Smith Root

Litigation, International, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Toby Borst

Business Organization, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lesley Herring

Family Law, Elder Law, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Erin Hrabak

Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Diane C Cady

Landlord-Tenant, Wills & Probate, Wrongful Termination, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Scappoose Estate Lawyers and Scappoose Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

SWEARING MATCH

A case that turns on the word of one witness versus another. The outcome of a swearing match usually depends on whom the jury finds most trustworthy.

WILL

A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for you... (more...)
A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for your young children.

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

CURATOR

See conservator.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.