Riva Estate Lawyer, Maryland

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Milton D. Jernigan

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Corporate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen C. Hosea

Real Estate, Intellectual Property, Estate, Business
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Esther A. Streete

Tax, Real Estate, Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Edward Lehr

Lawsuit, Social Security, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Page McGuire Linden

Trusts, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Judith Billage

Adoption, Divorce, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lindsey Warren Duvall

Trusts, Estate, Civil & Human Rights, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Nicholas T Exarhakis

Federal Appellate Practice, Trusts, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jessica E Zadjura

Family Law, Trusts, Juvenile Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Diana Lee Klein

Real Estate, Estate Administration, Corporate, Bankruptcy, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

ANCILLARY PROBATE

A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are... (more...)
A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are necessary if the deceased person owned real estate in another state.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Pautsch v. MARYLAND REAL ESTATE COM'N

16 A.3d 977 (2011). 418 Md. 587. JOEL PAUTSCH v. MARYLAND REAL ESTATE COM'N. Pet. Docket No. 619. Court of Appeals of Maryland. Granted April 22, 2011. Petition for Writ of Certiorari granted.

Attorney Grievance v. Kendrick

... 13, 1994, violated Rules 1.1 (Competence), [2] 1.3 (Diligence), [3] 1.5 (Fees), [4] 1.15 (Safekeeping Property), [5] and 8.4 (Misconduct) [6] of the Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct ("MRPC") in her representation as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Judith Nina ...

Kroll v. Fisher

... Circuit Court for Allegany County. Appellee is the personal representative of the estate of Mary D. Kroll ("Ms. Kroll"), and prior to Ms. Kroll's death, appellee acted as attorney-in-fact for Ms. Kroll. In his complaint, appellant alleged ...