Rapid City Trusts Lawyer, South Dakota


Jeffrey D. Swett

Corporate, Agriculture, Trusts, Prosecution
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy L. Thomas

Estate, Real Estate, Wills, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Joseph R. Lux

Corporate, Construction, Trusts, Federal Appellate Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Doyle D. Estes

Real Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Todd A. Schweiger

Real Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gustav K. Johnson

Real Estate, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tracy L. Kelley

Real Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

David L. Claggett

Bankruptcy, Commercial Real Estate, Trusts, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric John Nies

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

MINERAL RIGHTS

An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral right... (more...)
An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral rights is usually entitled to either take the minerals from the land himself or receive a royalty from the party that actually extracts the minerals.

SPRINKLING TRUST

A trust that gives the person managing it (the trustee) the discretion to disburse its funds among the beneficiaries in any way he or she sees fit.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Conservatorship of Didier

... Barbara Didier-Stager (Barbara), Evelyn's daughter and a beneficiary of the trusts, objected. ... The circuit court disagreed, authorizing the Conservator to exercise the power of the trustee "in the place and stead of Evelyn" in both trusts. Barbara appeals. ...

In re Reese Trust

... Ronald Chester, George Gleason Bogert & George Taylor Bogert, The Law of Trusts and Trustees § 431 (3d ed. 2005). [¶ 8.] With regard to parties in a cy pres proceeding: ... [¶ 11.] SDCL 55-9-4 appears in SDCL chapter 55-9 on charitable trusts. ...

Peterson v. Feldmann

... [¶ 3.] In July 2001, Laurence and May executed living trusts. The farm property was placed in the trusts. The trusts provided that upon the death of the trustors, Peterson had an option to purchase the property at its appraised value. ...