Pueblo Child Custody Lawyer, Colorado


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

R. Robert Clothier Lawyer

R. Robert Clothier

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption

R. Robert Clothier, born in Hollywood, California, December 18, 1958. Colorado resident since grade school. Admitted to the bar in 1983, Colorado Supr... (more)

Mary Kay Kramer

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Thomas Allen

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Family Law
Licensed:  4 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Wesley D. Hassler

Real Estate, Government, Child Custody, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years
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Robert Dennis Baumberger

Workers' Compensation, Employment, Child Custody, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Stephen A Jones

Child Custody, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Anna Hall Owen

Family Law, Juvenile Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

A. V. Anna Hall Owen

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Pat Marrison

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Brenda L. Tellez

Deportation, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

RESTRAINING ORDER

An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state... (more...)
An order from a court directing one person not to do something, such as make contact with another person, enter the family home or remove a child from the state. Restraining orders are typically issued in cases in which spousal abuse or stalking is feared -- or has occurred -- in an attempt to ensure the victim's safety. Restraining orders are also commonly issued to cool down ugly disputes between neighbors.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re LS

... The only explanation for the dismissal was that "the State of Nebraska has jurisdiction over the matter." The minute order made no reference to child custody. ... We conclude the Adams County District Court never declined child custody jurisdiction on inconvenient forum grounds. ...

PEOPLE EX REL. DP

... The UCCJEA addresses whether a Colorado court or a non-Colorado court has jurisdiction in child custody proceedings. See §§ 14-13-101 to -403. ... 423, 425, 535 P.2d 1122, 1123 (1975)(trial judges sitting in trial courts have discretion to make child custody determinations). ...

In re MJK

... Id. Modification statutes, on the other hand, do not do so, because "[i]n the modification context, the State has a compelling interest to protect the child's need for stability and to prevent constant litigation in child custody cases." Id. ...