Provo Estate Planning Lawyer, Utah

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Includes: Gift Taxation

Steven M. Rogers Lawyer

Steven M. Rogers

VERIFIED
Divorce, Car Accident, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Estate Planning

Steve is a Utah attorney who represents individuals and businesses in a variety of legal matters. Steve worked for large law firm with hundreds of att... (more)

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800-962-2421

Adam C. Brown

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Caleb O. Lyman

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Derek T. Marshall

Business Organization, Contract, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years
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John W Buckley

Business, Contract, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Jessica M Tyler

Adoption, Elder Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Lorie D Fowlke

Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Curtis Dee Harris

Immigration, Wills, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Thomas J Scribner

Commercial Real Estate, Social Security, Estate Planning, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Derek T Marshall

Power of Attorney, Lawsuit & Dispute, Health Care Other, Estate Planning, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Provo Estate Planning Lawyers and Provo Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

REAL ESTATE AGENT

A foot soldier of the real estate business who shows houses and does most of the other nitty-gritty tasks associated with selling real estate. An agent must hav... (more...)
A foot soldier of the real estate business who shows houses and does most of the other nitty-gritty tasks associated with selling real estate. An agent must have a state license and be supervised by a real estate broker. Most agents are completely dependent upon commissions from sellers for their income, so it pays to find out which side the agent represents (buyer, seller or both) before you place too much trust in the agent's opinion.

WARRANTY DEED

A seldom-used type of deed that contains express assurances about the legal validity of the title being transferred.

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kunzler v. Kunzler

... 2 The trial court also ruled that because Rous transferred her and her late husband's real estate into the Ranch for estate planning purposes, Husband's interest in the Ranch and the bulls that lived on the Ranch's land were his separate property. ...

GRGICH v. GRGICH

... Judge Henriod set forth ample subsidiary findings supporting his decision, including the overwhelming evidence that Husband was in sole control of the property, borrowed against it repeatedly, and admitted that he executed the quitclaim deed for estate planning purposes. ...

Neff v. Neff

... mismanagement of a family trust. According to Marvin, the brothers' parents, through establishment of a trust and other estate-planning devices, had devised a piece of land to Branson and Marvin as co-owners. [7] Marvin alleged that ...