Prescott Bankruptcy Lawyer, Arkansas


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Barry D. Barber

Real Estate, Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Eugene Benjamin Hale

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  58 Years

Rowe Stayton

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Barry Dale Barber

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

Eugene Benjamin Hale

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  58 Years

Duncan McRae Culpepper

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

R. Emily Devenney

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Duncan Mcrae Culpepper

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

R. Emily Devenney

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Albert Glenn Vasser

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Prescott Bankruptcy Lawyers and Prescott Bankruptcy Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Bankruptcy & Debt areas including Collection, Credit & Debt, Reorganization and Workout attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

LIMITED LIABILITY

The maximum amount a business owner can lose if the business is subject to debts, claims or other liabilities. An owner of a limited liability company (LLC) or ... (more...)
The maximum amount a business owner can lose if the business is subject to debts, claims or other liabilities. An owner of a limited liability company (LLC) or a person who invests in a corporation (a shareholder) generally stands to lose only the amount of money invested in the business. This means that if the business folds, creditors cannot seize or sell an owner's home, car, or other personal assets.

DISCHARGEABLE DEBTS

Debts that can be erased by going through bankruptcy. Most debts incurred prior to declaring bankruptcy are dischargeable, including back rent, credit card bill... (more...)
Debts that can be erased by going through bankruptcy. Most debts incurred prior to declaring bankruptcy are dischargeable, including back rent, credit card bills and medical bills. Compare nondischargeable debts.

PRIORITY DEBT

A type of debt that is paid first if there are distributions made from the bankruptcy estate in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must be paid in full in a Chapter 13... (more...)
A type of debt that is paid first if there are distributions made from the bankruptcy estate in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and must be paid in full in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Priority debts include alimony and child support, fees owed to the trustee and the attorney in the bankruptcy case, and wages owed to employees.

SECRET WARRANTY PROGRAM

A program under which a car manufacturer will make repairs for free on vehicles with persistent problems, even after the warranty has expired, in order to avoid... (more...)
A program under which a car manufacturer will make repairs for free on vehicles with persistent problems, even after the warranty has expired, in order to avoid a recall and the accompanying bad press. Secret warranties are rarely advertised by the manufacturer, so consumers must pursue the manufacturer to discover and take advantage of them. A few states require manufacturers to notify car buyers when they adopt secret warranty programs.

GARNISHMENT

A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if ... (more...)
A court-ordered process that takes property from a person to satisfy a debt. For example, a person who owes money to a creditor may have her wages garnished if she loses a lawsuit filed by the creditor. Up to 25% of a person's wages can be deducted.

FDCPA

See Fair Debt Collections & Practices Act.

ACCORD AND SATISFACTION

An agreement to settle a contract dispute by accepting less than what's due. This procedure is often used by creditors who want to cut their losses by collectin... (more...)
An agreement to settle a contract dispute by accepting less than what's due. This procedure is often used by creditors who want to cut their losses by collecting as much money as they can from debtors who cannot pay the full amount.

FORBEARANCE

Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily ... (more...)
Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily postponing or reducing the borrower's payments.

S CORPORATION

A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status fro... (more...)
A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status from the Internal Revenue Service. Electing to do business as an S corporation lets shareholders enjoy limited liability status, as would be true of any corporation, but be taxed like a partnership or sole proprietor. That is, instead of being taxed as a separate entity (as would be the case with a regular or C corporation) an S corporation is a pass-through tax entity: income taxes are reported and paid by the shareholders, not the S corporation. To qualify as an S corporation a number of IRS rules must be met, such as a limit of 75 shareholders and citizenship requirements.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Bibbs v. Community Bank of Benton

... On August 25, 2003, Bibbs filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. On February 8, 2005, Mason also filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, and in doing so, he scheduled a potential lender-liability lawsuit against Community Bank as an asset of the estate. ...

Bisbee v. Decatur State Bank

... The Wilmouths filed for bankruptcy the next month. After the bankruptcy court ... said lands. On December 9, 2008, the bankruptcy court abandoned tract number 8, which was included within appellee's mortgage. On December ...

Bibbs v. Community Bank

... On August 25, 2003, Bibbs filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Mason filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy on February 8, 2005, and filed Chapter 13 bankruptcy some months later. ... They alleged that the Bank engaged in numerous acts of misconduct and forced them into bankruptcy. ...