Ossian White Collar Crime Lawyer, Indiana


Megan Lynn Close Lawyer

Megan Lynn Close

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Traffic, Employment

Megan Close is a dedicated individual who commits her life and practice to the service of others. If you are looking for someone who you can trust, lo... (more)

Michael Richard McEntee Lawyer

Michael Richard McEntee

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Wills & Probate
General Practice and Workers Compensation since 1977

My name is Mike McEntee and I have been practicing law in Fort Wayne for over thirty years. I was born and raised here and my three children all went ... (more)

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Chad E. Kukelhan

Adoption, Animal Bite, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Michael T. Douglass

Family Law, Child Support, Adoption, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Aaron J Butler

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory A. Miller

Motor Vehicle, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Suzanne M. Wagner

Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph M. Johnson

Animal Bite, Bad Faith Insurance, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joseph M. Johnson

Adoption, Animal Bite, Criminal, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bart Arnold

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.