Orem Estate Planning Lawyer, Utah

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Includes: Gift Taxation

Steven M. Rogers Lawyer

Steven M. Rogers

VERIFIED
Divorce, Car Accident, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Estate Planning

Steve is a Utah attorney who represents individuals and businesses in a variety of legal matters. Steve worked for large law firm with hundreds of att... (more)

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CONTACT

800-962-2421

Adam C. Brown

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Caleb O. Lyman

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

John W Buckley

Business, Contract, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years
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Derek T. Marshall

Business Organization, Contract, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Jessica M Tyler

Adoption, Elder Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

Lorie D Fowlke

Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Curtis Dee Harris

Immigration, Wills, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Jacob A Stewart

International Tax, Estate Planning, Non-profit, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Thomas J Scribner

Commercial Real Estate, Social Security, Estate Planning, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Orem Estate Planning Lawyers and Orem Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

FAILURE OF ISSUE

A situation in which a person dies without children who could have inherited her property.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE

The person or institution who takes over the management of trust property when the original trustee has died or become incapacitated.

AB TRUST

A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of... (more...)
A trust that allows couples to reduce or avoid estate taxes. Each spouse puts his or her property in an AB trust. When the first spouse dies, his or her half of the property goes to the beneficiaries named in the trust -- commonly, the grown children of the couple -- with the crucial condition that the surviving spouse has the right to use the property for life and is entitled to any income it generates. The surviving spouse may even be allowed to spend principal in certain circumstances. When the surviving spouse dies, the property passes to the trust beneficiaries. It is not considered part of the second spouse's estate for estate tax purposes. Using this kind of trust keeps the second spouse's taxable estate half the size it would be if the property were left directly to the spouse. This type of trust is also known as a bypass or credit shelter trust.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kunzler v. Kunzler

... 2 The trial court also ruled that because Rous transferred her and her late husband's real estate into the Ranch for estate planning purposes, Husband's interest in the Ranch and the bulls that lived on the Ranch's land were his separate property. ...

GRGICH v. GRGICH

... Judge Henriod set forth ample subsidiary findings supporting his decision, including the overwhelming evidence that Husband was in sole control of the property, borrowed against it repeatedly, and admitted that he executed the quitclaim deed for estate planning purposes. ...

Neff v. Neff

... mismanagement of a family trust. According to Marvin, the brothers' parents, through establishment of a trust and other estate-planning devices, had devised a piece of land to Branson and Marvin as co-owners. [7] Marvin alleged that ...