Orange County, VT Construction Lawyers, page 5


Includes: Construction Contracts, Construction Liens, Housing & Construction Defects

Kerry B. DeWolfe

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Maggie Gilmore

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard A. Cawley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas Laddie Lushin

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Gavin A. Reid

Landlord-Tenant, Traffic, Lawsuit & Dispute, Immigration, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Susan P. Weider

Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jeffrey L. Taylor

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sigrun M. Brynjarsdottir

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Sheilagh C. Smith

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Creek C. Kelsey

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

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LEGAL TERMS

MEMORANDUM

(1) An informal written document. A memorandum may be used in any number of circumstances, but most lawyers are best acquainted with the interoffice memorandum-... (more...)
(1) An informal written document. A memorandum may be used in any number of circumstances, but most lawyers are best acquainted with the interoffice memorandum--a document prepared by a junior associate in a law office or a judge's law clerk outlining the facts, procedural elements and legal arguments involved in a particular legal matter. These memos are reviewed by senior lawyers and judges who use them to decide how to proceed with the case. (2) Any written record, including a letter or note, that proves that a contract exists between two parties. This type of memo may be enough to validate an oral (spoken) contract that would otherwise be unenforceable because of the statute of frauds. (Under the statute of frauds, an oral contract is invalid if it can't be completed within one year from the date the contract is made.)

APPRECIATION

An increase in value. Appreciated property is property that has gone up in value since it was acquired.

YELLOW-DOG CONTRACT

An employment contract in which the employer forbids the employee to join a labor union. Yellow-dog contracts are not legally enforceable.

SHORT SALE (OF HOUSE)

A sale of a house in which the proceeds fall short of what the owner still owes on the mortgage. Many lenders will agree to accept the proceeds of a short sale ... (more...)
A sale of a house in which the proceeds fall short of what the owner still owes on the mortgage. Many lenders will agree to accept the proceeds of a short sale and forgive the rest of what is owed on the mortgage when the owner cannot make the mortgage payments. By accepting a short sale, the lender can avoid a lengthy and costly foreclosure, and the owner is able to pay off the loan for less than what he owes. See also deed in lieu (or foreclosure).

GOODS & CHATTELS

See personal property.

EMINENT DOMAIN

The power of the federal or state government to take private property for a public purpose, even if the property owner objects. The Fifth Amendment to the Unite... (more...)
The power of the federal or state government to take private property for a public purpose, even if the property owner objects. The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows the government to take private property if the taking is for a public use and the owner is 'justly compensated' (usually, paid fair market value) for his or her loss. A public use is virtually anything that is sanctioned by a federal or state legislative body, but such uses may include roads, parks, reservoirs, schools, hospitals or other public buildings. Sometimes called condemnation, taking or expropriation.

INTANGIBLE PROPERTY

Personal property that has no physical existence, such as stocks, bonds, bank notes, trade secrets, patents, copyrights and trademarks. Such 'untouchable' items... (more...)
Personal property that has no physical existence, such as stocks, bonds, bank notes, trade secrets, patents, copyrights and trademarks. Such 'untouchable' items may be represented by a certificate or license that fixes or approximates the value, but others (such as the goodwill or reputation of a business) are not easily valued or embodied in any instrument. Compare tangible property.

DONATION

A gift of property. The IRS allows you to take an income tax deduction for the value of donations made to charitable organizations who are recognized as such by... (more...)
A gift of property. The IRS allows you to take an income tax deduction for the value of donations made to charitable organizations who are recognized as such by the IRS.

EASEMENT

A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as... (more...)
A right to use another person's real estate for a specific purpose. The most common type of easement is the right to travel over another person's land, known as a right of way. In addition, property owners commonly grant easements for the placement of utility poles, utility trenches, water lines or sewer lines. The owner of property that is subject to an easement is said to be 'burdened' with the easement, because he or she is not allowed to interfere with its use. For example, if the deed to John's property permits Sue to travel across John's main road to reach her own home, John cannot do anything to block the road. On the other hand, Sue cannot do anything that exceeds the scope of her easement, such as widening the roadway.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE EUSTANCE ACT 250 JURISDICTIONAL OPINION (# 2-231)

... PRESENT: Reiber, CJ, Dooley, Johnson, Skoglund and Burgess, JJ. DOOLEY, J. ¶ 1. Robert and Lourdes Eustance appeal an Environmental Court order that required an Act 250 permit amendment for the construction of improvements to their property. ...

Delta Psi Fraternity v. City of Burlington

... 32 VSA § 3802(5) (emphasis added). ¶ 7. When interpreting statutes, "[t]he bedrock rule of statutory construction is to determine and give effect to the intent of the Legislature." In re CS, 158 Vt. 339, 343, 609 A.2d 641, 643 (1992); see also Wesco, Inc. ...

In re Chatham Woods Holdings, LLC

... Except for excavation, the two owners of Chatham Woods did not directly participate in the construction of the units, but instead subcontracted the work to various construction companies. ... BK Construction, Inc. is owned by Bryan Howes. ...