Ogden Trusts Lawyer, Utah

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Kelly B Miles

Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Brent E Johns

Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Janice M. Welsh

Adoption, Personal Injury, Traffic, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

RULE AGAINST PERPETUITIES

An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For examp... (more...)
An exceedingly complex legal doctrine that limits the amount of time that property can be controlled after death by a person's instructions in a will. For example, a person would not be allowed to leave property to her husband for his life, then to her children for their lives, then to her grandchildren. The gift would potentially go to the grandchildren at a point too remote in time.

CREDIT SHELTER TRUST

See AB trust.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

EXECUTOR

The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's... (more...)
The person named in a will to handle the property of someone who has died. The executor collects the property, pays debts and taxes, and then distributes what's left, as specified in the will. The executor also handles any probate court proceedings and notifies people and organizations of the death. Also called personal representatives.

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

TRUSTEE POWERS

The provisions in a trust document defining what the trustee may and may not do.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Rawlings v. Rawlings

... I. CONSTRUCTIVE TRUSTS ARE A REMEDY THAT MAY BE IMPOSED WHERE A PARTY HAS BEEN UNJUSTLY ENRICHED OR WHERE NECESSARY TO GIVE EFFECT TO AN ORAL EXPRESS TRUST. ... [28] Restatement (Second) of Trusts § 2 cmt. b (1959). ...

Rawlings v. Rawlings

... However, we review a district court's decisions on questions of law, such as the legal requirements for the imposition of constructive trusts, for correctness. ... Confusingly, although the theories are conceptually quite different, they are both properly referred to as constructive trusts. ...

Allred v. Allred

... The documents named Richard as trustee of eight of the trusts and Richard's wife, Mary Lee Allred, as trustee of the trust for the benefit of Richard. ... In early 1983, the Parents signed another quitclaim deed conveying the remaining fifty-percent interest to the nine trusts. ...