Ogden Estate Lawyer, Utah

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Frank  Warner Lawyer

Frank Warner

VERIFIED
Estate, Estate Planning, Elder Law

Mr. Warner is a lifelong resident of Weber County, Utah. He graduated near the top of his class from the University of Utah Law School. He is a member... (more)

Lorraine P. Brown Lawyer

Lorraine P. Brown

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute

In 1955, C.S. Lewis surmised in a letter to Mrs. Johnson, that motherhood is "the job for which all others exist." If motherhood is the ultimate purp... (more)

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CONTACT

800-647-9650

Rand G. Lunceford

Eminent Domain, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Banking & Finance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Glen W Neeley

Juvenile Law, Traffic, Wills, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Glen Neeley

Juvenile Law, Traffic, Wills, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kelly B Miles

Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Judy D Barking

Estate Planning, Family Law, Consumer Protection, Elder Law, Non-profit
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Brent E Johns

Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Kristopher S Kaufman

Estate Planning, Family Law, Civil Rights, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Celeste C Canning

Estate, Real Estate, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Ogden Estate Lawyers and Ogden Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to t... (more...)
Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to the state. Some states have public administrators who are responsible for temporarily preserving the assets of an estate if there are disputes about specific provisions in the will or about who will be appointed the regular administrator.

OFFICER

A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operation... (more...)
A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. Officers generally hold titles such as President or Treasurer. Many states and most corporate bylaws or LLC operating agreements require a corporation or LLC to have a president, secretary and treasurer. Election of a vice president may be required by state law.

ANCILLARY PROBATE

A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are... (more...)
A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are necessary if the deceased person owned real estate in another state.

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

DEED OF TRUST

See trust deed.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.