Nehalem Adoption Lawyer, Oregon


Stacy Christine Rodriguez

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Mari Garric Trevino

Land Use & Zoning, Federal, Family Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  32 Years

Dawn M Mcintosh

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Stacey L Lamont

Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years
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Lois A Albright

Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Nancy A Nordlander

Other, Government, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

John H Tuthill

Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Christian K Hooley

Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Matthew D Lyon

Lawsuit & Dispute, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dustin Andrew Johnson

Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

ADULTERY

Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are ra... (more...)
Consensual sexual relations by a married person with someone other than his or her spouse. In many states, adultery is technically a crime, though people are rarely prosecuted for it. In states that have retained fault grounds for divorce, adultery is always sufficient grounds for a divorce. In addition, some states alter the distribution of property between divorcing spouses in cases of adultery, giving less to the 'cheating' spouse.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State ex rel. Juv. Dept. v. JFB

... This is a consolidated appeal by mother from four juvenile court judgments involving two of her children; the first set of judgments arises out of a June 2008 permanency hearing in which the court approved a concurrent plan of adoption over mother's objection, and the second ...

JBD v. Plan Loving Adoptions Now, Inc.

... App. 75. In the Matter of the Adoption of GIB, aka GIBD, a Minor Child. ... SCHUMAN, J. Plaintiff, the birth mother of G, released and surrendered him to an adoption agency called Plan Loving Adoptions Now, Inc., 268 (PLAN), and consented to his adoption from that agency. ...

STATE EX REL. DHS v. HSC

... SERCOMBE, J. Father appeals a judgment authorizing the Department of Human Services (DHS) to pursue adoption as the permanency plan for his daughter, S, who earlier was made a ward of the court. ... The court approved the concurrent plan of adoption. ...