Nashville Family Law Lawyer, Tennessee


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Heather  Piper Lawyer

Heather Piper

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce

Hall Booth Smith, P.C. (HBS) delivers quality legal services in a variety of practice areas for over 20 years. Experience across legal disciplines co... (more)

Samuel Gray Holloway Lawyer

Samuel Gray Holloway

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

focuses his practice in the areas of Family Law and Criminal Law. He earned his Doctorate of Jurisprudence at the University of Memphis School of Law.... (more)

James A. Flexer

Social Security -- Disability, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Brett Michael Gipson

Family Law, Traffic, Divorce, Farms
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John J. Hollins

Criminal, Divorce, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rachel C. Welty

Collaborative Law, Family Law, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jennifer Lynne Sheppard

Wills, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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J. Allen Brown

Personal Injury, Car Accident, Mediation, Family Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jacqueline B. Dixon

Litigation, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Derek K. Burks

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

SOLE CUSTODY

An arrangement whereby only one parent has physical and legal custody of a child and the other parent has visitation rights.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Carter

... to make the traffic stop, establishing that this subject had recklessly endangered his passenger and was also breaking the law." The driver ... sister) in which she asked the court to probate the Defendant's sentence and also offered several letters from other family members asking ...

Satterfield v. Breeding Insulation Co.

... [25] See Phillip G. Peters, Jr., Rethinking Wrongful Life: Bridging the Boundary Between Tort and Family Law, 67 Tul. L.Rev. 397, 431 (1992); Lisa E. Heinzerling, Comment, Actionable Inaction: Section 1983 Liability for Failure to Act, 53 U. Chi. L.Rev. ...

Martin v. Norfolk Southern Ry. Co.

... According to the Martin family agreement, members of the family would stop in advance of the tracks, lower the windows of the vehicle slightly, turn the radio ... that there were no genuine issues of material fact and that Mrs. Martin was at least fifty percent at fault as a matter of law. ...