Myrtle Beach Felony Lawyer, South Carolina

Sponsored Law Firm


Dalton B. Floyd Lawyer

Dalton B. Floyd

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Estate, Criminal

Dalton B. Floyd, Jr. is an attorney practicing in the State of South Carolina. His law practice, established in 1973 is a complete source for almost a... (more)

David E. Rigney Lawyer

David E. Rigney

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic, Business, Immigration

If you have been injured or are disabled, give me a call. If you need legal advice before you sign a contract, enter into a lease, or sign a business... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

843-352-3529

Stephanie Vaught Little Lawyer

Stephanie Vaught Little

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Personal Injury, Criminal

Stephanie Vaught Little practices in the areas of personal injury, family law and criminal defense. Her mission is simple: to help people. She believe... (more)

Dean N. Mureddu

Personal Injury, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Daniel Alan Hunnicutt

Workers' Compensation, Criminal, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Jim Irvin

Criminal, Accident & Injury, Workers' Compensation, Sexual Harassment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  54 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

William Grammer

Criminal, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Michael H Wells

Criminal, Traffic, Workers' Compensation, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Greg McCollum

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

Roland Bradley Yates

Criminal, Car Accident, Felony, Divorce, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  9 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Myrtle Beach Felony Lawyers and Myrtle Beach Felony Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.