Myrtle Beach Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


Dalton B. Floyd Lawyer

Dalton B. Floyd

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Estate, Criminal

Dalton B. Floyd, Jr. is an attorney practicing in the State of South Carolina. His law practice, established in 1973 is a complete source for almost a... (more)

David E. Rigney Lawyer

David E. Rigney

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Traffic, Business, Immigration

If you have been injured or are disabled, give me a call. If you need legal advice before you sign a contract, enter into a lease, or sign a business... (more)

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843-352-3529

Margaret L. Evans Lawyer

Margaret L. Evans

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy, Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Personal Injury

Margaret L. Evans has been practicing law since 1997. She has been representing parties in divorce cases and custody actions since her admission to pr... (more)

Stephanie Vaught Little Lawyer

Stephanie Vaught Little

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Personal Injury, Criminal

Stephanie Vaught Little practices in the areas of personal injury, family law and criminal defense. Her mission is simple: to help people. She believe... (more)

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Melissa Johnson Emery

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Sarah Elizabeth Whatley

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Abby Edwards Saunders

Real Estate, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Adam Andrew Szyszkowski

Foreclosure, Wills & Probate, Child Custody, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Allison Deborah Gordon

Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  4 Years

Allyson Rice Pittman

Child Custody, Criminal, Medical Malpractice, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  3 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

STEPPARENT ADOPTION

The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relativ... (more...)
The formal, legal adoption of a child by a stepparent who is living with a legal parent. Most states have special provisions making stepparent adoptions relatively easy if the child's noncustodial parent gives consent, is dead or missing, or has abandoned the child.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

SEPARATION

A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though... (more...)
A situation in which the partners in a married couple live apart. Spouses are said to be living apart if they no longer reside in the same dwelling, even though they may continue their relationship. A legal separation results when the parties separate and a court rules on the division of property, such as alimony or child support -- but does not grant a divorce.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.