Murfreesboro Child Custody Lawyer, Tennessee


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Emily  Leininger Lawyer

Emily Leininger

VERIFIED
Divorce, Child Custody, Juvenile Law, Divorce & Family Law

Emily Moore Leininger practices primarily in the areas of Divorce, Family Law, and Juvenile Law. She handles cases of divorce, child custody and vi... (more)

Samuel Gray Holloway Lawyer

Samuel Gray Holloway

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

focuses his practice in the areas of Family Law and Criminal Law. He earned his Doctorate of Jurisprudence at the University of Memphis School of Law.... (more)

Heather  Piper Lawyer

Heather Piper

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce

Hall Booth Smith, P.C. (HBS) delivers quality legal services in a variety of practice areas for over 20 years. Experience across legal disciplines co... (more)

Betsy Crow

Child Custody, Adoption, Wills & Probate, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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Mitchell Edward Shannon

Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael W. Binkley

Divorce, Toxic Mold & Tort, Child Custody, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jacob Thomas Thorington

Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

William Holloway

Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Ernest Neil Campbell

Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Lisa Ewing

International Other, Wills, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

INTERLOCUTORY DECREE

A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. ... (more...)
A court judgment that is not final until the judge decides other matters in the case or until enough time has passed to see if the interim decision is working. In the past, interlocutory decrees were most often used in divorces. The terms of the divorce were set out in an interlocutory decree, which would become final only after a waiting period. The purpose of the waiting period was to allow the couple time to reconcile. They rarely did, however, so most states no longer use interlocutory decrees of divorce.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION

A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equit... (more...)
A legal principle, followed by most states, under which assets and earnings acquired during marriage are divided equitably (fairly) at divorce. In theory, equitable means equal, but in practice it often means that the higher wage earner gets two-thirds to the lower wage earner's one-third. If a spouse obtains a fault divorce, the 'guilty' spouse may receive less than his equitable share upon divorce.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Tuetken v. Tuetken

... protected. See Tenn.Code Ann. § 36-6-106(a); Kendrick v. Shoemake, 90 SW3d 566, 570 (Tenn.2002) (holding that child custody awards are always subject to modification to ensure that the best interests of the child are protected). ...

Pippin v. Pippin

... However, our Supreme Court has held that a trial court may modify an award of child custody "when both a material change of circumstances has occurred and a change of custody is in the child's best interests." See Kendrick v. Shoemake, 90 SW3d 566, 568 (Tenn.2002). ...

In Matter of MLP

... Specifically, Father argued that Tennessee Code Annotated section 37-2-403 (2005 & Supp.2008), which requires the Tennessee Department of Children's Services to notify parents of this ground for termination when a child is in the custody of a state agency such as DCS, is ...