Mount Airy Trusts Lawyer, Maryland

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Marcia Ellen Anderson

Social Security, Government, Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Thomas R Rus

Corporate, Securities, Trusts, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

C Mayda Colon Tsaknis

Litigation, Trusts, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

SPRINKLING TRUST

A trust that gives the person managing it (the trustee) the discretion to disburse its funds among the beneficiaries in any way he or she sees fit.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

HEIR APPARENT

One who expects to be receive property from the estate of a family member, as long as she outlives that person.

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

CURATOR

See conservator.

OFFICER

A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operation... (more...)
A person elected by a profit or nonprofit corporation's board of directors, or by the manager of a limited liability company, to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. Officers generally hold titles such as President or Treasurer. Many states and most corporate bylaws or LLC operating agreements require a corporation or LLC to have a president, secretary and treasurer. Election of a vice president may be required by state law.

INCOMPETENCE

The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at ... (more...)
The inability, as determined by a court, to handle one's own personal or financial affairs. A court may declare that a person is incompetent after a hearing at which the person is present and/or represented by an attorney. A finding of incompetence may lead to the appointment of a conservator to manage the person's affairs. Also known as 'incompetency.'

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson v. Johnson

... George T. Bogert, The Law of Trusts and Trustees § 181 at 244-46 (Rev.2d ed.1979) (internal footnotes omitted). ... Once the shares were distributed into Trusts A and B, the Trust set forth how the Trustee was to hold, manage, and distribute the Trust. ...

Elder v. Smith

... Vol.), § 8-104 of the Estates and Trusts Article ("ET"). ... Again, the Estates and Trusts Article governs such claims, and there is nothing in that Article permitting a creditor with a pre-death claim to enhance the priority of its claim post-death. ...

Spry v. Gooner

... appellants lacked standing. The basis of the order was that appellants were not "interested persons" within the meaning of Maryland Code (2001 Repl.Vol., 2008 Supp.), § 1-101(i) of the Estates & Trusts Article ("ET"). Ralph Gooner ...

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