Missoula Family Law Lawyer, Montana


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Susan J Callaghan

Family Law, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy M. Scott Smith

Family Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Autumn Thompson

Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Divorce, Child Support, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years

Autumn Thompson

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  7 Years
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Brian Michael Lebsock

Traffic, Family Law, Criminal, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

David James Lockhart

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Debra M. Schied

Personal Injury, Toxic Mold & Tort, Insurance, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Douglas Keith Womack

Motor Vehicle, Government, Family Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Elizabeth A Kaleva

Other, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Eric Mills

Criminal, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

ATTORNEY FEES

The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (... (more...)
The payment made to a lawyer for legal services. These fees may take several forms: hourly per job or service -- for example, $350 to draft a will contingency (the lawyer collects a percentage of any money she wins for her client and nothing if there is no recovery), or retainer (usually a down payment as part of an hourly or per job fee agreement). Attorney fees must usually be paid by the client who hires a lawyer, though occasionally a law or contract will require the losing party of a lawsuit to pay the winner's court costs and attorney fees. For example, a contract might contain a provision that says the loser of any lawsuit between the parties to the contract will pay the winner's attorney fees. Many laws designed to protect consumers also provide for attorney fees -- for example, most state laws that require landlords to provide habitable housing also specify that a tenant who sues and wins using that law may collect attorney fees. And in family law cases -- divorce, custody and child support -- judges often have the power to order the more affluent spouse to pay the other spouse's attorney fees, even where there is no clear victor.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Charles M. Bair Family Trust

... 28 We review a district court's findings of fact to determine whether they are clearly erroneous. Slauson v. Bertelsen Family Trust, 2006 MT 314, ¶ 10, 335 Mont. 43, ¶ 10, 151 P.3d 866, ¶ 10. We review for correctness a district court's conclusions of law. Slauson, ¶ 10. ...

Whitlow v. State

... because counsel failed to conduct a 868 thorough investigation of the defendant's background, not because of any strategic calculation, but because counsel incorrectly thought that state law barred access ... [EF]: Yes, I read about it in the papers and discussed it with the family. ...

Modroo v. Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Company

... an insurance contract presents a question of law, which we review for correctness. Wendell, ¶ 10. The medical payments endorsement defines "Insured" as "1. You while `occupying' or while a pedestrian, when struck by any `auto.' 2. If you are an individual, any `family member'. ...