Missoula Family Law Lawyer, Montana


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Susan J Callaghan

Family Law, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Frank R. Harrison

Mediation, Family Law, Divorce, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Debra M. Schied

Personal Injury, Toxic Mold & Tort, Insurance, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

P Mars Scott

Toxic Mold & Tort, Commercial Real Estate, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Ryan Alane Phelan

Commercial Real Estate, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Terry L. Wolfe

Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  33 Years

Philip J O Connell

Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric Mills

Criminal, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ronald A. Thuesen

Federal Trial Practice, Commercial Real Estate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly C. Harkin

Residential Real Estate, Commercial Real Estate, Family Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Missoula Family Law Lawyers and Missoula Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

DIVORCE

The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers wit... (more...)
The legal termination of marriage. All states require a spouse to identify a legal reason for requesting a divorce when that spouse files the divorce papers with the court. These reasons are referred to as grounds for a divorce.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

CONSORTIUM

(1) A group of separate individuals or companies that come together to undertake an enterprise or transaction that is beyond the means of any one member. For ex... (more...)
(1) A group of separate individuals or companies that come together to undertake an enterprise or transaction that is beyond the means of any one member. For example, a group of local businesses may form a consortium to fund and construct a new office complex. (2) The duties and rights associated with marriage. Consortium includes all the tangible and intangible benefits that one spouse derives from the other, including material support, companionship, affection, guidance and sexual relations. The term may arise in a lawsuit if a spouse brings a claim against a third party for 'loss of consortium' after the other spouse is injured or killed.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Charles M. Bair Family Trust

... 28 We review a district court's findings of fact to determine whether they are clearly erroneous. Slauson v. Bertelsen Family Trust, 2006 MT 314, ¶ 10, 335 Mont. 43, ¶ 10, 151 P.3d 866, ¶ 10. We review for correctness a district court's conclusions of law. Slauson, ¶ 10. ...

Whitlow v. State

... because counsel failed to conduct a 868 thorough investigation of the defendant's background, not because of any strategic calculation, but because counsel incorrectly thought that state law barred access ... [EF]: Yes, I read about it in the papers and discussed it with the family. ...

Modroo v. Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Company

... an insurance contract presents a question of law, which we review for correctness. Wendell, ¶ 10. The medical payments endorsement defines "Insured" as "1. You while `occupying' or while a pedestrian, when struck by any `auto.' 2. If you are an individual, any `family member'. ...