Missoula Child Support Lawyer, Montana


Bradley J. Jones Lawyer

Bradley J. Jones

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Contract, Mediation

After five years with Bulman Law associates PLLC Bradley J. Jones is expanding his practice and purchasing an established law practice of his own in M... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-906-0910

Mathew  Stevenson Lawyer

Mathew Stevenson

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury

Stevenson Law Office was established by Mathew Stevenson in 2002 and has been serving Western Montana since. Mat Stevenson is a Montana Native, bor... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-906-0680

Susan J Callaghan

Family Law, Franchising, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

David James Lockhart

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Diana Elyse Garrett

Child Custody, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Dwight J Schulte

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

P Mars Scott

Toxic Mold & Tort, Commercial Real Estate, Personal Injury, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

P.Mars Scott

Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Rachel Glenn Pannabecker

Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thaddeus J. Brinkman

Real Estate, Estate, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

COMPARABLE RECTITUDE

A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that pre... (more...)
A doctrine that grants the spouse least at fault a divorce when both spouses have shown grounds for divorce. It is a response to an old common-law rule that prevented a divorce when both spouses were at fault.