Midland Estate Planning Lawyer, Michigan


Includes: Gift Taxation

Jason Paul Taylor

Land Use & Zoning, Federal Appellate Practice, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

David Hunter

Juvenile Law, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Christ A. Anagnost

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  60 Years

John L. Gustincic

Tax, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years
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Ramon F. Rolf

Trusts, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Joseph D. Weiler

Medicare & Medicaid, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Gregory T. Demers

Agriculture, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Paul R. Larsen

Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

John E. Kessler

Estate Planning, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Jeffrey N. Dyer

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Midland Estate Planning Lawyers and Midland Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

ALTERNATE BENEFICIARY

A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to ... (more...)
A person, organization or institution that receives property through a will, trust or insurance policy when the first named beneficiary is unable or refuses to take the property. For example, in his will Jake leaves his collection of sheet music to his daughter, Mia, and names the local symphony as alternate beneficiary. When Jake dies, Mia decides that the symphony can make better use of the sheet music than she can, so she refuses (disclaims) the gift, and the manuscripts pass directly to the symphony. In insurance law, the alternate beneficiary, usually the person who receives the insurance proceeds because the initial or primary beneficiary has died, is called the secondary or contingent beneficiary.

ANCILLARY PROBATE

A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are... (more...)
A probate proceeding conducted in a different state from the one the deceased person resided in at the time of death. Usually, ancillary probate proceedings are necessary if the deceased person owned real estate in another state.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

FAMILY POT TRUST

See pot trust.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE ESTATE OF SOUTHWORTH

... Margaret Noe. In February 2005, the decedent consulted Noe for estate planning advice. The ... estate plan. The representative offered to meet with the decedent and answer any questions regarding estate planning and the college. Despite ...

IN RE HAYES

... In addition, the survivor may amend or revoke the trust." [Brief at 8, citing Michigan Estate Planning Handbook (Carol J. Karr ed., ICLE 2d ed, 2006), ch 22, § 22.4.]. ... [Michigan Estate Planning Handbook (Carol J. Karr ed., ICLE 2d ed, 2006), ch 22, § 22.4.]. ...

Charfoos v. Schultz

... including trust documents, as in this case. Bullis v Downes, 240 Mich App 462, 468; 612 NW2d 435 (2000) (no distinction made among varieties of modern estate planning tools). Here, the trial court prohibited plaintiffs from ...