Metairie Family Law Lawyer, Louisiana


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Elizabeth Allums Widhalm Lawyer

Elizabeth Allums Widhalm

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Elder Law, Child Custody, Family Law, Divorce

Elizabeth Widhalm is a practicing lawyer in the state of Lousiana.

Edith H Morris Lawyer

Edith H Morris

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law

EDITH H. MORRIS is a partner in the New Orleans law firm of Morris, Lee and Bayle, LLC, where she practices Family Law and Adoptions. She specializes... (more)

Sharon D. Williams Lawyer

Sharon D. Williams

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Wills & Probate, Child Custody, Estate Planning

Resourceful and fierce advocate for client but capable of negotiating non-litigation solutions. Ability to see the big picture in order to bring t... (more)

Phyllis C. Coci

Wills, Wills & Probate, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           
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M Lapuyade Piglia

Employment, Estate Planning, Family Law, Labor Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

D. Douglas Howard, Jr.

Family Law, Civil Rights, Asbestos & Mesothelioma, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrea L. Rubin

Family Law, Wills & Probate, Civil Rights, Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Sandra S. Salley

Litigation, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Steven E. Psarellis

Litigation, International Other, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Carl A Butler

Banking & Finance, Civil Rights, Family Law, Employee Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

MARITAL PROPERTY

Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital... (more...)
Most of the property accumulated by spouses during a marriage, called community property in some states. States differ as to exactly what is included in marital property; some states include all property and earnings dring the marriage, while others exclude gifts and inheritances.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

ACKNOWLEDGED FATHER

The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and t... (more...)
The biological father of a child born to an unmarried couple who has been established as the father either by his admission or by an agreement between him and the child's mother. An acknowledged father must pay child support.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE

The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even... (more...)
The taking of a child from his or her parent with the intent to interfere with that parent's physical custody of the child. This is a crime in most states, even if the taker also has custody rights.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

BROUSSARD THERAPY v. Family Dollar Stores, Inc.

... applicant. Keogh, Cox & Wilson, Edward Frank Strauss, III, Holly Clement Hargrove, Virginia Jordan McLin, Baton Rouge, The Williams Family Law Firm, Richard Bray Williams, Natchitoches, for respondent. Stephen Winston ...

Ghassemi v. Ghassemi

... cousins. See Martin Oppenheimer, FORBIDDEN RELATIVES: THE AMERICAN MYTH OF COUSIN MARRIAGE, 90 (1996); Ann Laquer Estin, Embracing Tradition: Pluralism in American Family Law, 63 Md. L.Rev. 540, 564 (2004). ...

Family Care Services, Inc. v. Owens

... Accordingly, the parties hereto expressly agree that FAMILY CARE shall have the right, independent of and in addition to any provision for other remedies herein, and in addition to all of the remedies provided at law or in equity, to injunctive relief by any appropriate legal means ...