Marion County, OR Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyers

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Rex K. Daines Lawyer

Rex K. Daines

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy & Debt, Accident & Injury, Consumer Rights

Rex K. Daines graduated from Willamette University College of Law in 1995 with a JD and from Utah State University in 1992 with a BA in accounting wi... (more)

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503-362-9393

Brendan Enright

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Keith Daniel Karnes

Civil Rights, Credit & Debt, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christopher Bruce Matheny

Estate Planning, Civil Rights, Contract, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Eric Wayne Olsen

Non-profit, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Eric Wayne Olsen

Non-profit, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Keith D Karnes

Civil Rights, Credit & Debt, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy, Landlord-Tenant
Status:  In Good Standing           

David W Jacobson

Bankruptcy, Business & Trade, Commercial Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

James L. McGehee

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Child Support, Consumer Protection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Kevin Dale Swartz

Child Custody, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

DEBT COLLECTOR

A person who works in the in-house collections department of an original creditor or a collection agency to track down debtors and get them to pay what they owe... (more...)
A person who works in the in-house collections department of an original creditor or a collection agency to track down debtors and get them to pay what they owe. Debt collectors can be relentless, often using scare tactics, humiliation and repeated phone calls to extract payments or promises to pay.

SECRET WARRANTY PROGRAM

A program under which a car manufacturer will make repairs for free on vehicles with persistent problems, even after the warranty has expired, in order to avoid... (more...)
A program under which a car manufacturer will make repairs for free on vehicles with persistent problems, even after the warranty has expired, in order to avoid a recall and the accompanying bad press. Secret warranties are rarely advertised by the manufacturer, so consumers must pursue the manufacturer to discover and take advantage of them. A few states require manufacturers to notify car buyers when they adopt secret warranty programs.

LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner ... (more...)
A business structure that allows one or more partners (called limited partners) to enjoy limited personal liability for partnership debts while another partner or partners (called general partners) have unlimited personal liability. The key difference between a general and limited partner concerns management decision making--general partners run the business, and limited partners, who are usually passive investors, are not allowed to make day-to-day business decisions. If they do, they risk being treated as general partners with unlimited personal liability.

LOSS DAMAGE WAIVER (LDW)

Rental car insurance that makes the rental car company responsible for damage to or theft of a rental car. This insurance is a major consumer ripoff, as it ofte... (more...)
Rental car insurance that makes the rental car company responsible for damage to or theft of a rental car. This insurance is a major consumer ripoff, as it often duplicates coverage provided by the renter's regular car insurance and/or the credit card she uses to rent the car. Nevertheless, hard-sell practices by rental car agents often dupe people into buying LDWs they don't really need. LDW is also called 'collision damage waiver.'

NO-FAULT INSURANCE

Car insurance laws that require the insurance companies of each person in an accident to pay for medical bills and lost wages of their insured, up to a certain ... (more...)
Car insurance laws that require the insurance companies of each person in an accident to pay for medical bills and lost wages of their insured, up to a certain amount, regardless of who was at fault. The effect of no-fault insurance laws is to eliminate lawsuits in small accidents. The advantage is the prompt payment of medical bills and expenses. The downsides are that the amounts paid by no-fault policies are often not enough to fully cover a person's losses and that no-fault does not compensate for pain and suffering.

UNDUE HARDSHIP

The circumstances in which a debtor may discharge a student loan in bankruptcy. For example, a debtor who has no income and little chance of earning enough in t... (more...)
The circumstances in which a debtor may discharge a student loan in bankruptcy. For example, a debtor who has no income and little chance of earning enough in the future to pay off the loan may be able to show that repayment would be an undue hardship.

SETOFF

A claim made by someone who allegedly owes money, that the amount should be reduced because the other person owes him money. This is often raised in a countercl... (more...)
A claim made by someone who allegedly owes money, that the amount should be reduced because the other person owes him money. This is often raised in a counterclaim filed by a defendant in a lawsuit. Banks may try to exercise a setoff by taking money out of a deposit account to satisfy past due payments on a loan or credit card bill. Such an act is illegal under most circumstances.

S CORPORATION

A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status fro... (more...)
A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status from the Internal Revenue Service. Electing to do business as an S corporation lets shareholders enjoy limited liability status, as would be true of any corporation, but be taxed like a partnership or sole proprietor. That is, instead of being taxed as a separate entity (as would be the case with a regular or C corporation) an S corporation is a pass-through tax entity: income taxes are reported and paid by the shareholders, not the S corporation. To qualify as an S corporation a number of IRS rules must be met, such as a limit of 75 shareholders and citizenship requirements.

FORBEARANCE

Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily ... (more...)
Voluntarily refraining from doing something, such as asserting a legal right. For example, a creditor may forbear on its right to collect a debt by temporarily postponing or reducing the borrower's payments.