Madison Estate Lawyer, Mississippi

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William James Dukes Lawyer

William James Dukes

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Business, Estate, Intellectual Property, Power of Attorney, Tax

A Mississippi native, William J. Dukes pursued graduate studies in physics before law school. Mr. Dukes focuses his practice on the needs of small bus... (more)

Owen P. Lalor Lawyer

Owen P. Lalor

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Business, Estate, Workers' Compensation

Owen P. Lalor received his Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Economics from St. Louis University, received his Juris Doctor from Vanderbilt Univ... (more)

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Tammy L Barham

International Tax, Litigation, Estate Administration
Status:  In Good Standing           

R David Marchetti

Commercial Real Estate, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Corporate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Jay A. Norris

Tax, Estate Planning, Transactions, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ashley Nicole Wicks

Banking & Finance, Commercial Real Estate, Gift Taxation, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           

James P. Knight

Tax, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Benjamin Powell Sones

Corporate, Entertainment, Credit & Debt, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Benjamin Powell Sones

Corporate, Entertainment, Credit & Debt, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Betty Slade Derossette

Estate, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Madison Estate Lawyers and Madison Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

SPECIAL ADMINISTRATOR

(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a spe... (more...)
(1) In the law of wills and estates, a person appointed by the court to take charge of only a designated portion of an estate during probate. For example, a special administrator with particular expertise on art might be appointed to oversee the probate of a wealthy person's art collection, but not the entire estate. (2) A person appointed to be responsible for a deceased person's property for a limited time or during an emergency, such as a challenge to the will or to the qualifications of the named executor. In such cases, the special administrator's duty is to maintain and preserve the estate, not necessarily to take control of the probate process

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

PREDECEASED SPOUSE

In the law of wills, a spouse who dies before the will maker while still married to him or her.

REMAINDERMAN

Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderma... (more...)
Someone who will inherit property in the future. For instance, if someone dies and leaves his home 'to Alma for life, and then to Barry,' Barry is a remainderman because he will inherit the home in the future, after Alma dies.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

RESIDUARY BENEFICIARY

A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leav... (more...)
A person who receives any property by a will or trust that is not specifically left to another designated beneficiary. For example, if Antonio makes a will leaving his home to Edwina and the remainder of his property to Elmo, then Elmo is the residuary beneficiary.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

DEATH TAXES

Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who... (more...)
Taxes levied at death, based on the value of property left behind. Federal death taxes are called estate taxes. Some states levy inheritance taxes on people who inherit property.

SURROGATE COURT

See probate court.