Ludlow Child Support Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Leslie McLellan Brown Lawyer

Leslie McLellan Brown

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Divorce & Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements, Divorce, Family Law, Child Support

For more than 32 years, Attorney Leslie McLellan Brown has been dedicated to obtaining the fairest result possible. Providing in-depth knowledge and h... (more)

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Douglas D Nichols

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Coreen Goodwin

Landlord-Tenant, Lawsuit & Dispute, Family Law, Child Support, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Michael Brendan Doherty

International, Child Support, Misdemeanor, Business
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Andrea R. Reid

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Asylum, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Robert M. Mack

Lawsuit & Dispute, Industry Specialties, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brian S. Fitzgerald

Real Estate Other, Real Estate, Estate, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Jane Mantolesky

Lawsuit & Dispute, Immigration, Estate, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Stephen N. Krevalin

Real Estate, Immigration, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  45 Years

Claudette-Jean Girard

Adoption, Child Support, Divorce, Education
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

HOME STUDY

An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial s... (more...)
An investigation of prospective adoptive parents to make sure they are fit to raise a child, required by all states. Common areas of inquiry include financial stability, marital stability, lifestyles and other social factors, physical and mental health and criminal history.

BRIEF

A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she shoul... (more...)
A document used to submit a legal contention or argument to a court. A brief typically sets out the facts of the case and a party's argument as to why she should prevail. These arguments must be supported by legal authority and precedent, such as statutes, regulations and previous court decisions. Although it is usually possible to submit a brief to a trial court (called a trial brief), briefs are most commonly used as a central part of the appeal process (an appellate brief). But don't be fooled by the name -- briefs are usually anything but brief, as pointed out by writer Franz Kafka, who defined a lawyer as 'a person who writes a 10,000 word decision and calls it a brief.'

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

FOREIGN DIVORCE

A divorce obtained in a different state or country from the place where one spouse resides at the time of the divorce. As a general rule, foreign divorces are r... (more...)
A divorce obtained in a different state or country from the place where one spouse resides at the time of the divorce. As a general rule, foreign divorces are recognized as valid if the spouse requesting the divorce became a resident of the state or country granting the divorce, and if both parties consented to the jurisdiction of the foreign court. A foreign divorce obtained by one person without the consent of the other is normally not valid, unless the nonconsenting spouse later acts as if the foreign divorce were valid, for example, by remarrying.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

JS v. CC

... [1] A judge in the Probate and Family Court granted joint legal custody of Sapphire to the defendant (mother) and the plaintiff (father), and physical custody to the mother, subject to the father's right of visitation; the judge also ordered the father to pay child support in the amount ...

Draper v. Burke

... 677 GREANEY, J. The defendant (husband) appeals from a Probate and Family Court order denying his motion to dismiss the plaintiff's (wife) complaint for modification of a child support order issued by an Oregon State court. ... See also Child Support Enforcement Div. ...

Caplan v. Donovan

... 3 (g) allows the exercise of personal jurisdiction over a person who maintains "a domicile in this [C]ommonwealth while a party to a personal or marital relationship out of which arises a claim for divorce, alimony, property settlement, parentage of a child, child support or child ...