Little Rock Estate Planning Lawyer, Arkansas, page 4


Includes: Gift Taxation

Gregory B Graham

Commercial Real Estate, Health Care Other, Health Care, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

Christopher Brockett

Tax, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Leisa Pulliam

Credit & Debt, Business & Trade, Commercial Real Estate, Gift Taxation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Marvin L Childers

Commercial Real Estate, Estate Administration, Gift Taxation, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years
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David Horn

Estate Planning, Divorce, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Paul Duke White

Elder Law, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ray Thornton

Estate Planning, Business & Trade, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  65 Years

Earl Fletcher Jackson

Real Estate, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  58 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

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800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Little Rock Estate Planning Lawyers and Little Rock Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

LAPSE

Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. S... (more...)
Under a will, the failure of a gift of property. A gift lapses when the beneficiary dies before the person who made the will, and no alternate has been named. Some states have anti-lapse statutes, which prevent gifts to relatives of the deceased person from lapsing unless the relative has no heirs of his or her own. A lapsed gift becomes part of the residuary estate.

FINAL BENEFICIARY

The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jan... (more...)
The person or institution designated to receive trust property upon the death of a life beneficiary. For example, Jim creates a trust through which his wife Jane receives income for the duration of her life. Their daughter, the final beneficiary, receives the trust principal after Jane's death.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR

Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to t... (more...)
Someone appointed by a probate court to oversee probate proceedings when a person dies without a will or heirs, and his or her property is expected to pass to the state. Some states have public administrators who are responsible for temporarily preserving the assets of an estate if there are disputes about specific provisions in the will or about who will be appointed the regular administrator.

MINERAL RIGHTS

An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral right... (more...)
An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral rights is usually entitled to either take the minerals from the land himself or receive a royalty from the party that actually extracts the minerals.

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

PROBATE COURT

A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate cour... (more...)
A specialized court or division of a state trial court that considers only cases concerning the distribution of deceased persons' estate. Called 'surrogate court' in New York and several other states, this court normally examines the authenticity of a will -- or if a person dies intestate, figures out who receives her property under state law. It then oversees a procedure to pay the deceased person's debts and to distribute her assets to the proper inheritors. See probate.

ESTATE PLANNING

The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your... (more...)
The art of continuing to prosper when you're alive, and passing your property to your loved ones with a minimum of fuss and expense after you die. Planning your estate may involve making a will, living trust, healthcare directives, durable power of attorney for finances or other documents.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Sanford v. Murdoch

... [1] As such, documents relevant to her financial and estate planning were in Sanford's possession. Included ... [3] Morgan then requested that Sanford deliver the financial and estate planning documents in his possession to her. Sanford ...

Fitton v. Bank of Little Rock

... She maintains that the conveyance of the property to a revocable trust for estate planning purposes did not destroy her homestead exemption. She also claims that she did not "abandon" her homestead, under Arkansas law, by conveying her property to a revocable trust. ...

Ashley v. Ashley

... Prior to the decedent's death, his attorney, William Haught, prepared several estate-planning documents for the decedent, including a will, a family limited-partnership agreement, and a revocable trust, all of which were executed on April 4, 1997. ...