Liberty Lake Estate Planning Lawyer, Washington


Includes: Gift Taxation

Karen Linda Sayre

International Tax, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  35 Years

Jennifer Hedges Ballantyne

Wills, Estate Planning, Estate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Hilary M Brown

International Tax, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

Joseph Steve Jolley

Construction, Estate Planning, Elder Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

Jane G. Bitz

Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Elder Law, Civil Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

William Scott Hislop

Land Use & Zoning, Estate Planning, Civil Rights, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

James Allen Wolff

Landlord-Tenant, Estate Planning, Civil Rights, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  47 Years

Raymond Eric Pearman-Gillman

Commercial Real Estate, Wills, Estate Planning, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

C. Raymond Eberle

Civil Rights, Estate Planning, Federal, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  55 Years

David Howard Herman

Corporate, Foreclosure, Estate Planning, Federal
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  46 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Liberty Lake Estate Planning Lawyers and Liberty Lake Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

COUNTERCLAIM

A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wron... (more...)
A defendant's court papers that seek to reverse the thrust of the lawsuit by claiming that it was the plaintiff -- not the defendant -- who committed legal wrongs, and that as a result it is the defendant who is entitled to money damages or other relief. Usually filed as part of the defendant's answer -- which also denies plaintiff's claims -- a counterclaim is commonly but not always based on the same events that form the basis of the plaintiff's complaint. For example, a defendant in an auto accident lawsuit might file a counterclaim alleging that it was really the plaintiff who caused the accident. In some states, the counterclaim has been replaced by a similar legal pleading called a cross-complaint. In other states and in federal court, where counterclaims are still used, a defendant must file any counterclaim that stems from the same events covered by the plaintiff's complaint or forever lose the right to do so. In still other states where counterclaims are used, they are not mandatory, meaning a defendant is free to raise a claim that it was really the plaintiff who was at fault either in a counterclaim or later as part of a separate lawsuit.

WILL

A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for you... (more...)
A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for your young children.

DOWER AND CURTESY

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') ... (more...)
A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a 'dowry') refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse's dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

MINERAL RIGHTS

An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral right... (more...)
An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral rights is usually entitled to either take the minerals from the land himself or receive a royalty from the party that actually extracts the minerals.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

IN RE ESTATE OF PALMER

... According to Fivecoat, the Palmers wanted to make a charitable contribution to World Gospel Mission after hearing his presentation on estate planning and charitable giving at an annual World Gospel Mission missionary conference. ...

IN RE DISCIPLINARY PROC. AGAINST BOTIMER

... The complaint alleged three counts of violating the RPCs stemming from Botimer's representation of Ruth in her tax, business, and estate planning matters. ... Botimer also assisted Ruth on estate planning matters, while advising Jan as a potential beneficiary of Ruth's estate. ...

State v. Thompson

... She said they needed the gifting power provided by the second power of attorney in order to do "estate planning" for Crawford. She said they spent Crawford's money on their charter business because it was a safer investment than the stock market. ...